benign myalgic encephalomyelitis

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inflammation of the brain and spinal cord.
acute disseminated encephalomyelitis an acute or subacute encephalomyelitis or myelitis occurring most commonly following an acute viral infection, especially measles, but sometimes occurring without a recognizable antecedent. Clinical manifestations include fever, headache, vomiting, and drowsiness progressing to lethargy and coma; tremor, seizures, and paralysis may also occur. Mortality ranges from 5 to 20 per cent, and many survivors have residual neurologic deficits.
benign myalgic encephalomyelitis chronic fatigue syndrome.
equine encephalomyelitis a type of encephalomyelitis in horses and mules, caused by an alphavirus and spread to humans by mosquitoes; it occurs in summer epizootics in the Western Hemisphere. Three forms are recognized: eastern, western, and Venezuelan. Called also equine encephalitis.
equine encephalomyelitis, eastern a viral disease similar to western equine encephalomyelitis, but occurring in a region extending from New Hampshire to Texas and as far west as Wisconsin, and in Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and parts of Central and South America.
equine encephalomyelitis, Venezuelan a viral disease of horses and mules, transmissible to humans; the causative agent was first isolated in Venezuela. The infection in humans resembles influenza, with little or no indication of nervous system involvement.
equine encephalomyelitis, western a viral disease of horses and mules, communicable to humans, occurring chiefly as a meningoencephalitis with little involvement of the medulla oblongata or spinal cord; observed in the United States chiefly west of the Mississippi River.
granulomatous encephalomyelitis a disease marked by granulomas and necrosis of the walls of the cerebral and spinal ventricles.
postinfectious encephalomyelitis (postvaccinal encephalomyelitis) acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

ep·i·dem·ic neu·ro·my·as·the·ni·a

an epidemic disease characterized by stiffness of the neck and back, headache, diarrhea, fever, and localized muscular weakness; restricted almost exclusively to adults, affecting women more than men; probably viral in origin.

benign myalgic encephalomyelitis

chronic fatigue syndrome

A condition resembling poliomyelitis, which was first described in the mid-1980s in California, often following viral infections (e.g., herpes, hepatitis, CMV) or which may be induced by an unrecognised virus. CFS is defined by a new onset (not lifelong) of unexplained, persistent fatigue unrelated to exertion and not substantially relieved by rest, which causes a significant reduction in previous activity levels. While CFS had been associated with EBV infection, more than half of those with the CFS improve without a change in EBV titers.

Unknown, psychosocial dysfunction has been implicated.
Clinical findings
Unexplained persistent fatigue, inability to concentrate, weakness, lymphadenopathy and malaise, severe headache, myalgia, myasthenia, variable cranial and peripheral nerve dysfunction and depression.

None; alleged reported cures are thought to be due to placebo response or spontaneous remission; recuperation requires up to a year.

Chronic Fatigue syndrome symptoms
Four or more of the following symptoms that last six months or longer:
• Impaired memory or concentration;
• Post-exertional malaise, where physical or mental exertion bring on extreme, prolonged exhaustion and sickness.
• Unrefreshing sleep.
• Myalgia.
• Arthalgias.
• Headaches of a new kind or greater severity.
• Sore throat, frequent or recurring.
• Tender lymph nodes (cervical or axillary).

ep·i·dem·ic neu·ro·my·as·the·ni·a

(ep'i-dem'ik nūr'ō-mī-ăs-thē'nē-ă)
An epidemic disease characterized by stiffness of the neck and back, headache, diarrhea, fever, and localized muscular weakness; probably viral in origin.
Compare: chronic fatigue syndrome
Synonym(s): benign myalgic encephalomyelitis, Iceland disease.

Patient discussion about benign myalgic encephalomyelitis

Q. I think i might have chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia. how can i tell the difference? So far, the doctors have not been able to diagnose anything and have basically been putting me on random medications just to relieve the symptoms. Symptoms I have: Fatigue (sleeping thirteen hours +) exhaustion pain in my knees, ankles, and weirdly my elbows. Headaches, congestion. I’ve been really nauseous occasionally and ended up having to go to the ER because of it.

A. Here is a site that might help you. You can type in the symptoms one at a time and it’ll give you optional illnesses that correlates with the symptoms:

Q. What can cause chronic fatigue? For the last few weeks I’ve been having this strange fatigue, I sleep 12-14 hours at night (I used to sleep 6-7 hours), and I’m tired all day long. It really bothers me. What can is be?

A. Wow, there are so many…to give you a taste- here is a list. I guess some of them you can rule out pretty easily through checking your habits and other symptoms (if you have any):

Q. How do you know when your tiredness is a chronic health symptom? Sometimes I'm just overwhelmingly tired and need to lay down for awhile. Then I feel better but then I haven't accomplished a lot. At least after I rest I am able to do things again. What is Chronic Fatigue all about?

A. Wow! Good question!
I tell you what- here is a very good site I use all the time. You enter a symptom and it gives you all the illnesses that have the symptom. Then you enter another symptom you have and it narrows the list.
I already entered fatigue for you:

and here is a site about chronic fatigue syndrome that you can look for differences:

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