benign microcalcifications

benign microcalcifications

Aggregates of precipitated calcium salts, which by light microscopy appear as purplish crystalline debris. Benign microcalcifications usually lack clinical significance and occur in various tissues—e.g., blood vessel walls in atherosclerosis—or in necrosis.

Microcalcifications
Type I—Occur in benign lesions of the breast (e.g., 1Sclerosing adenoma, fibrocystic disease, proliferative fibrocystic disease, fibroadenoma, atrophy, fibrosis); type I MCs are birefringent, colourless, composed of calcium oxalate and poorly visualised without polarisation.
 
Type II—Occur in benign and malignant lesions of the breast (e.g., ductal carcinoma, lobular carcinoma, ductal CIS, lobular CIS, atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia); type II MCs are a deep purplish colour by light microscopy, and composed of calcium phosphate.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, we have found that, when microcalcifications are visualized with US, there is a statistically different presentation between malignant and benign microcalcifications. US finding of "hyperechoic dots within hypoechoic mass, area or dilated ducts" was most commonly related to malignancy, while finding of "isolated microcalcifications within normal breast tissue" was seen only in benign cases.
There is statistically significant difference in presentation between malignant and benign microcalcifications when MRI BI-RADS descriptors are applied in the analysis.
* When MRI BI-RADS descriptors are applied in analysis, microcalcifications present most commonly as non-mass lesions, with statistically significant difference in presentation of malignant and benign microcalcifications. Highest risk of malignancy is found for segmental distribution and clumped internal enhancement.
It produces a sort of "teacup" appearance in benign microcalcifications. This occurs when the milk of calcium settles to the bottom of multiple tiny cysts, producing an image of clustered linear and curvilinear calcifications in lateral projection radiographs.
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