benign


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benign

 [be-nīn´]
not recurrent; favorable for recovery with appropriate treatment. The opposite of malignant.

be·nign

(bē-nīn'),
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

/be·nign/ (bĕ-nīn´) not malignant; not recurrent; favorable for recovery.

benign

(bĭ-nīn′)
adj.
a. Having little or no detrimental effect; harmless: a benign chemical; benign indifference.
b. Of no danger to health; not malignant or disease-causing: a benign tumor.

be·nign′ly adv.

benign

[binīn′]
Etymology: L, benignus, kind
(of a tumor) noncancerous and therefore not a direct threat to life, even though treatment eventually may be required for health or cosmetic reasons. See also benign neoplasm. Compare malignant.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumour that does not invade or metastasise, for which surgical excision is curative.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumor that does not invade or metastasize, for which surgical excision is curative. Cf Malignant.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

Not MALIGNANT. Mild, and of favourable outlook. Not usually tending to cause death. A benign tumour is a local growth, from an increase in the number of cells, which has no tendency to invade adjacent tissues or to seed out to remote parts of the body. Benign tumours are commonly enclosed in a definite capsule. They can, however cause trouble by local pressure effects, especially in confined spaces such as the inside of the skull.

benign

nonmalignant, as of a growth.

Benign

In medical usage, benign is the opposite of malignant. It describes an abnormal growth that is stable, treatable and generally not life-threatening.

benign

non-malignant, non-invasive and non-threatening

benign,

adj noncancerous; descriptive term for tumors, moles, and growths.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign (bēnīn´),

adj a condition that, untreated or with symptomatic therapy, will not become life threatening. It is used particularly in relation to tumors, which may be benign or malignant. They do not invade surrounding tissues and do not metastasize to other parts of the body. The word is slightly imprecise, as some can, due to mass effect, cause life-threatening complications.

benign

not malignant; not recurrent; favorable for recovery.

benign enzootic paresis
see porcine viral encephalomyelitis.
benign fibrillators
horses with a history of poor performance in races which suffer an attack of atrial fibrillation during or immediately after a race which soon recovers spontaneously so that the abnormality often goes undetected.
benign footrot
occurs under very wet conditions. Caused by Dichelobacter nodosus of low virulence. There is dermatitis of the interdigital skin and minimal underrunning of horn at the heel. See also interdigital dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Benign fibroblastic polyps of the colon are mucosal spindle cell proliferations first described by Eslami-Varzaneh et al (1) in 2004.
For women with benign breast disease, there was a borderline significant positive association with breast cancer risk for the highest quintile of caffeine consumption and for the highest category of coffee consumption ([greater than or equal to]4 cups daily).
Each year approximately 3 million women will experience a first incidence of benign breast disease.
Data regarding age and pre-surgical findings on ultrasound or CT scan in favor of benign or malignant ovarian tumor was obtained from the request forms.
Commonest benign breast lesion in female was fibroadenoma (62.
The role of exposure to various irritants and "microclimate" at the working place in the causation of common benign lesions of larynx was assessed and it was observed that 16 patients (32%) were smokers, 5 patients (10%) had exposure to dust, 2 patients (4%) were having incense exposure, and 2 patients (4%) were farmers and had exposure to hay and pollens.
The frozen section diagnosis concurred with the final histopathology report as to the category of benign, borderline or malignant neoplasms in 47(92.
Although the risk of malignancy after two benign cytology results is virtually zero, routine repeat biopsy is not a viable or cost-effective option because of the low false negative rate," the document notes.
The pathological characteristics attest the benign phenotype of the tumor.
The pathologists assigned each area to four main categories ranging from benign to invasive melanoma based on their judgments of how far the cells in each area had progressed toward malignancy.
Therefore, the discrimination between benign and malignant tumors on the basis of conventional CT and MRI findings is still difficult in a substantial number of cases, [sup][9],[10] and new imaging method is required to improve the discrimination.