benign


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benign

 [be-nīn´]
not recurrent; favorable for recovery with appropriate treatment. The opposite of malignant.

be·nign

(bē-nīn'),
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

(bĭ-nīn′)
adj.
a. Having little or no detrimental effect; harmless: a benign chemical; benign indifference.
b. Of no danger to health; not malignant or disease-causing: a benign tumor.

be·nign′ly adv.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumour that does not invade or metastasise, for which surgical excision is curative.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumor that does not invade or metastasize, for which surgical excision is curative. Cf Malignant.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

Not MALIGNANT. Mild, and of favourable outlook. Not usually tending to cause death. A benign tumour is a local growth, from an increase in the number of cells, which has no tendency to invade adjacent tissues or to seed out to remote parts of the body. Benign tumours are commonly enclosed in a definite capsule. They can, however cause trouble by local pressure effects, especially in confined spaces such as the inside of the skull.

benign

nonmalignant, as of a growth.

Benign

In medical usage, benign is the opposite of malignant. It describes an abnormal growth that is stable, treatable and generally not life-threatening.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]
References in periodicals archive ?
The cytopathology reports classified the results as benign, indeterminate, suspicious for malignancy, malignant, or inadequate.
Of the cases studied, 250 (59.5%) tumours were benign, 24(5.7%) were borderline and 146 (34.8%) were malignant.
In this study, it was aimed to investigate the contribution of biochemical tests and cell analysis performed as standard procedures in pleural fluid sample before invasive methods in the separation of paramalign (benign)-malignant pleural effusion.
The integrated classifier demonstrated sensitivity, specificity, and a negative predictive value of 97, 44, and 98 percent, respectively, in distinguishing benign from malignant nodules.
The mean age for benign tumours was 36.7, borderline tumours was 49.7 and malignant tumours was 48.1.
The AI uses machine learning to identify and understand what it "sees" in images, with researchers saying it quickly learned the difference between malignant and benign moles.
At the Memorial Center for Integrative Endocrine Surgery, the Afirma GSC identified approximately 51% more indeterminate nodules as benign, compared to the first-generation Afirma test.
Fibroadenoma is a common benign breast lesion that typically occurs in young patients between ages of 20 and 35 years3.
Histologically, the tumor was composed of smooth muscle proliferation and a very low index of proliferation (Ki-67 < 10%), supporting a benign process.
Our study, thus aims to show the difference in DWI/ADC values between benign and malignant lesions of breast in local setting which will add to the national database about diagnostic features of malignant breast lesions.
The objective of the study was to compare morphologic findings on sonograms with the resistive index (RI) of benign and malignant lesions and to find out the best RI cut-off value for the discrimination between benign and malignant ovarian masses.