benefit


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benefit

(ben'ĕ-fit),
Monies disbursed by a private insurance company or public entity (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid) in settlement of a claim for medical services provided.

benefit

A valued or desired outcome; an advantage.

Managed care
Healthcare which are provided under the terms of a health insurance policy should the need arise.

BENEFIT

Abbreviation for:
Betaferon in newly emerging multiple sclerosis for initial treatment

ben·e·fit

(ben'ĕ-fit)
The payment or services provided by an insurance policy or health care plan.

Patient discussion about benefit

Q. Oregano, does it benefit? Is oregano taken for prevention or cure?

A. Nothing that I know about, at least not scientifically proven.

Q. What are the benefits of childhood vaccines? Oh vaccine causes autism? Then how about childhood vaccines? What are the benefits of childhood vaccines?

A. It is just a thought/feel/rumor. Don’t worry about people talk. But it is important to remember, vaccines protect and save lives. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, vaccines are the single-most powerful, cost-effective public health intervention ever developed. Because of the availability of vaccines, few children in the United States are harmed by measles, polio, tetanus or other serious vaccine-preventable diseases. If parents stopped getting vaccines for their children the number of cases of these diseases will increase and so will the number of serious health problems and deaths.

Q. What benefits does yoga have on nutritional disorder? I've heard yoga can help "organize" the daily nutrition and the metabolism? Is it true? Does anyone know how it does it?? Unfortunately I deal with nutrition issues all day long and would love to find something to make it go away...

A. I am not sure I know of any relation between yoga and organizing daily nutrition.. Yoga is a very good physical activity for back problems, muscle pain and flexibility, and it does make you burn some calories via using your muscles, however it is not an aerobic physical activity and it does not help burn fat like running, riding a bike or swimming.

More discussions about benefit
References in periodicals archive ?
Another strategy is to apply for and suspend a benefit. This strategy works if spouses are close in age and one spouse has a significantly higher full retirement age benefit.
Many taxpayers may wish to suspend benefits because they believe they will be able to avoid paying taxes on these benefits if they are received later in life, when the taxpayer may be in a lower income tax bracket.
Financial challenges, lack of retirement funds and the need for benefits are some of the reasons older individuals are remaining on the job.
Dame Suzi states that, "Our aim will be to ensure both that charities demonstrate public benefit in what they do and, beyond that, continue to increase the value they bring to the communities they serve."
"When an organization has an at-risk plan in its controlled group, the organization may find more restrictions in funding nonqualified benefits. This could disrupt funding for other nonqualified programs.
The dilemma is this: few qualifying companies take full advantage of the benefits available to them.
There is also variety in how much of the benefits' costs are passed on to retirees.
2000), an employer's issuance of American Express restaurant credit-card vouchers were held to have "cash equivalent benefit" and did not qualify as de minimis fringe benefits.
For example, in fiscal year 2005, the Board of Veterans' Appeals granted one or more of the benefits sought in 21.3 percent of the appeals in which claimants were represented by attorneys who have the luxury of hand picking their clients.
When Anita Baker joined Larson Allen Weishair in the 1980s, nonspecialist partners performed its EBP audits and the primary resource was the Employee Benefit Plans--AICPA Audit and Accounting Guide.
was intended to be just what it says--a social security that provides benefits to those most in need.
Their principles include competition between private sector insurance and "traditional" Medicare and differing medication benefits for older Americans of varying incomes.