beneficience

beneficience

The accomplishment of good. In research, beneficence refers to a central focus on the well-being of the participants in a clinical trial.
References in periodicals archive ?
A consequentialist may view the principles of Beneficience and Non-Malificence as being at opposite ends of the same process.
Thereby HAES upholds the ethical principles of beneficience and nonmaleficience by focusing on eradicating weight stigma, honoring human differences (size diversity), and pursuing empirically supported interventions that promote physical health and psychological well-being (see https://www.sizediversityandhealth.org/content.asp?id=197/ for HAES Principles [32]).
A consequentialist may view the principles of Beneficience and NonMalificence as being at opposite ends of the same process.
CHRIS BROWN, "Beneficience." Adviser: David Schmidtz.
compare and contrast autonomy and beneficience as tools for medically-related decision-making.
McCullough, The Hidden Issue in Futility Judgments: Justifying Turning the Traditional Logic of Beneficience on Its Head, in EUTHANASIA: THE GOOD OF THE PATIENT, THE GOOD OF SOCIETY, supra note 4, at 139.
C-sections as ideal birth: the cultural construction of beneficience and patients rights in Brazil Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1994;3: 358-66.
(13) The Belmont Report (14) presented 5 key ethical principles for governing conduct: respect for a person's autonomy, beneficience, justice, nonmaleficence and fidelity.
They worked their way down to three principles: "respect for persons, beneficience, and justice." They then came up with three procedures "to guarantee that the means would not violate the ends: 'informed consent' to guarantee respect for persons; 'risk/benefit assessment' to guarantee beneficence, and 'fair procedures for the selection of research subjects' to guarantee justice" (84).
If most widows and orphans pay their rent on time but bear the increased rental costs, the intended beneficience of the decision could be offset by the large unintended consequences of the decision.
The second ethical principle underlying research is beneficience, that of doing good.
James Drane considers beneficience, that is, the good work a doctor does for persons who are ill, to be medicine's "fundamental ethical standard," and benevolence to be the virtue that disposes doctors to provide medical help.[1] He also includes as cardinal virtues for physicians respect and concern for patients, truthfulness, friendliness, and justice.