beneficence


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Related to beneficence: Nonmaleficence

beneficence

 [bĕ-nef´ĭ-sens]
the doing of active goodness, kindness, or charity, including all actions intended to benefit others. It is contrasted to benevolence, which refers to the character trait or moral virtue of being disposed to act for the benefit of others. In bioethics, the principle of beneficence refers to a moral obligation to act for the benefit of others. Not all acts of beneficence are obligatory, but a principle of beneficence asserts an obligation to help others further their interests. Obligations to confer benefits, to prevent and remove harms, and to weigh and balance the possible goods against the costs and possible harms of an action are central to bioethics.

Beneficence may be considered to include four components: (1) one ought not to inflict evil or harm (sometimes called the principle of nonmaleficence); (2) one ought to prevent evil or harm; (3) one ought to remove evil or harm; and (4) one ought to do or promote good.

ben·e·fi·cence

(be-nef'ĭ-sens),
The ethical principle of doing good.
[L. beneficentia, fr. bene, well, + facio, to do]

ben·e·fi·cence

(bĕ-nef'i-sĕns)
The habit, intention, or practice of doing good.
[L. beneficentia, fr. bene, well, + facio, to do]

beneficence (b·neˑ·fi·sns),

n a principle of medical ethics according to which a person should do good to others, especially when one has a professional duty to do so.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beneficence versus justice in the context of public health
Beneficence refers to actions which promote the well-being of others.
In modern terms, writes Roberts, prudence means "taking care of yourself"; justice means "not hurting others"; and beneficence means "being good to others.
The principles of beneficence [5] and non-maleficence [6] also support the principle of patient autonomy concerning information about fees.
Dilemmas occur when two ethical principles conflict, such as veracity and beneficence.
As a result, nature gives them what Henry David Thoreau says, "The beneficence of the sun and the wind and rain of summer and winter" that keep them forever in good health and cheer.
The tension between the two marches--Cynthia's personal agenda and the Reverend Martin Luther King's profound demands on human conscience--and the several deaths whose webs stretch to a mad woman's arson and self-immolation build into the explosive climax of the novel, uniting tragedy with a desperate cry for the beneficence of love.
Bowie has developed a body of work explicating what he calls "Kantian capitalism," addressing managerial ethics, moral motivation in business, corporate beneficence, meaningful work, and the natural environment.
As an observant Jew, I offer a prayer to God every morning that my daily bread comes through his beneficence and not a human hand so that I might retain my dignity.
There is a lovely summary of ethical principles and case studies that are developed to address each of the four ethics principles: autonomy, beneficence, fidelity, and justice.
One thing strikingly absent from her Diamond Jubilee celebrations was any publicly known beneficence from the Queen herself towards the British people.