beneficence


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Related to beneficence: Nonmaleficence

beneficence

 [bĕ-nef´ĭ-sens]
the doing of active goodness, kindness, or charity, including all actions intended to benefit others. It is contrasted to benevolence, which refers to the character trait or moral virtue of being disposed to act for the benefit of others. In bioethics, the principle of beneficence refers to a moral obligation to act for the benefit of others. Not all acts of beneficence are obligatory, but a principle of beneficence asserts an obligation to help others further their interests. Obligations to confer benefits, to prevent and remove harms, and to weigh and balance the possible goods against the costs and possible harms of an action are central to bioethics.

Beneficence may be considered to include four components: (1) one ought not to inflict evil or harm (sometimes called the principle of nonmaleficence); (2) one ought to prevent evil or harm; (3) one ought to remove evil or harm; and (4) one ought to do or promote good.

ben·e·fi·cence

(be-nef'ĭ-sens),
The ethical principle of doing good.
[L. beneficentia, fr. bene, well, + facio, to do]

ben·e·fi·cence

(bĕ-nef'i-sĕns)
The habit, intention, or practice of doing good.
[L. beneficentia, fr. bene, well, + facio, to do]
References in periodicals archive ?
When duties of respect for autonomy and duties of beneficence appear to conflict, in my experience it is almost always possible to find a course of action that can fulfill both.
Beneficence versus justice in the context of public health
Beneficence refers to actions which promote the well-being of others.
He puts much less weight on self-interest and highlights beneficence toward our fellow humans.
Bioethical principles require that doctors respect their patients' autonomy and apply the principles of beneficence, non-maleficence and fairness or justice.
According to B'Tselem, the Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories, "Israel treats Palestinian residents of East Jerusalem as immigrants who live in their homes at the beneficence of the authorities and not by right."
In addition to four core moral principles ("Autonomy," "Beneficence," "Non-Maleficence," and "Justice"), this framework includes four core behavioral norms of particular importance in guiding ethical decisions involving work with patients, other clients, and human research subjects ("Veracity," "Privacy," "Confidentiality," and "Fidelity") (Table 1).
WITH regard to Mr Makin's piece drawing attention to the "beneficence" of United Utilities in "granting" us discounts on our water and sewage accounts.
The Zayed Future Energy Prize, for example, a part of the ADSW, is a beneficence that promotes eco-friendly ideas across the world by funding start-ups in schools and corporates.
As a result, nature gives them what Henry David Thoreau says, "The beneficence of the sun and the wind and rain of summer and winter" that keep them forever in good health and cheer.
The tension between the two marches--Cynthia's personal agenda and the Reverend Martin Luther King's profound demands on human conscience--and the several deaths whose webs stretch to a mad woman's arson and self-immolation build into the explosive climax of the novel, uniting tragedy with a desperate cry for the beneficence of love.
Bowie has developed a body of work explicating what he calls "Kantian capitalism," addressing managerial ethics, moral motivation in business, corporate beneficence, meaningful work, and the natural environment.