bending fracture

bend·ing frac·ture

an injury in which a long bone or bones, usually the radius and ulna, are bent (that is, angulated) due to multiple microfractures, none of which can be seen by x-ray imaging.

bending fracture

1 a fracture indirectly caused by the bending of an extremity, such as the foot or the big toe.
2 a deformity of a long bone caused by multiple small fractures.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result of a simple calculus, one could determine the energy necessary for the delamination, bending fracture, respectively penetration of the bullet, by using the following relations:
Unlike the first two situations, when delamination and bending fracture of the test bar depend on the relative values of [tau], respectively [sigma] and on the l/h ratio, in the latter case, the bullet will penetrate or not, according to the incidental energy and the bullet's dimensions.
A simple calculus can determine the necessary energy for: delamination, bending fracture, bullet penetration.
This action tends to cause crushing of the tenon on its inside edge and a bending fracture on its outside edge at its point of entry into the bottom face of the rafter.
Where experimental points have been lashed to hafts, the sudden loading of weight from impact onto edges in contact with the haft bindings often produces clusters of bending fractures on the lateral margins (Shea 1988: 443).
Clusters of bending fractures were macroscopically observed on 88 per cent of the whole points and this damage was to the laterals on the proximal and/or medial portions (Table 3; Figure 1).
Furthermore, of the whole points with ochre concentrated on proximal and/or medial portions, 68 per cent also display damage in the form of clusters of bending fractures (Figure 1), removal of part of the proximal dorsal ridges (Figure 2), proximal crushing and polish on the proximal surfaces or dorsal ridges at the proximal end of the tool (Figure 4) (Table 3).