benchmark

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benchmark

(bench′mark″)
1. A criterion of quality or service in health care, usually expressed as a measurable standard.
2. A reference standard or basis for comparison that serves as a definition of a norm.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
A second reason that might be proposed for trusting marketing benchmarks is competitive pressure.
(https://www.xda-developers.com/benchmark-cheating-strikes-back-how-oneplus-and-others-got-caught-red-handed-and-what-theyve-done-about-it/) XDA noted that One Plus 3 and OnePlus 3T were the subjects of a similar benchmark cheating issue in January.
The former lends itself to comparison of performance statistics as benchmarks, while the latter requires that citizens and local officials agree on desired levels of service quality before selecting benchmarking partners.
The produced innovation proles product benchmarks for manufacturing SMEs in specic sectors that indicate the optimum position for an SMEs of similar topology and denes attributes or properties that an SMEs has to have in place to reach that position.
The conducted experimental research works demonstrate the usefulness of designed and created mechanical benchmark snap-in in transferring heights from the partly recessed benchmarks to other benchmarks or temporary height points.
In addition, the text regulates the information used to develop benchmarks. The Commission recommends using information from real transactions and, in cases where this information is insufficient, basing benchmarks on estimated transactions.
It seems like an obvious requirement to me that the benchmark hardware and OS should be isolated from other production, development, or test environments.
Gensler called for 'a coordinated global effort' to identify alternative interest rate benchmarks anchored in observable transactions and plan a smooth and orderly transition from benchmarks referencing unsecured, interbank markets.
The leadership system can be measured by comparing governance and social responsibility of the organization against available benchmarks. The human resource system can be assessed by measuring employee satisfaction and turnover rates, which are easily compared within the health care sector.
PPACA calls for state and federal agencies to set up exchanges, or Web-based health insurance supermarkets, by 2014, and for the plans sold through the exchanges to offer packages of benefits based on the EHB benchmarks, to ensure that consumers get comprehensive coverage, help them with apples-to-apples comparisons, and discourage insurers from watering down benefits.