bells and whistles


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bells and whistles

A popular term for non-essential features or anything extraneous to a particular device or subject—e.g., colour and high-tech or ostentatious graphics in an otherwise scholarly textbook, or an imaging device that outputs files data and images to non-specialists and patients.
References in periodicals archive ?
It may not have all the bells and whistles of a full-scale branch library, but at least it gets something in the hands of kids before they graduate from high school.
All of the bells and whistles will be available to tenants of the park, from high-speed telecommunications in both wired and wireless forms, to high-capacity power for heavy users.
A: If you're in the market for a bargain PC, the first thing to be sure of is whether your computing needs can be satisfied by a system that may not have all of the bells and whistles of its more expensive siblings.
5T Titanium edition wagon with all the bells and whistles.
It just won't have all the bells and whistles we originally envisioned.
Tabloid-sized newsletters often tend to get carried away with graphic bells and whistles that leave the reader wondering where to start reading, but Health & Science Quarterly resists that in favor of respecting its readers by giving them a sophisticated and eminently readable publication.
The Swanke Hayden Connell-designed tower will have "all the bells and whistles," with backup systems, special HVAC, high electrical and floor loads, plus a gym and restaurant to take care of the people needs and not just the hard drives.
Color Explosion, a new drawing activity from Crayola that's become one of the holiday season's hot sellers, is among several toys that offer kids an exciting play experience sans electronic bells and whistles.