belle indifference

la belle in·dif·fér·ence

(lah bel an-dif-er-ahns'),
A naive, inappropriate calmness or lack of concern in the face of perceptions by others of one's disability, often seen in those with conversion disorder but no longer considered pathognomonic for conversion disorder. Compare: anosodiaphoria.
[Fr.]

la belle in·dif·fér·ence

(lah bel ahn'dēf-ār-ahns')
A naive, inappropriate lack of emotion or concern for the perceptions by others of one's disability, typically seen in persons with conversion hysteria.
[Fr.]

belle indifference

An inappropriate lack of emotional response to claimed severe disablement or incapacitating symptoms in HYSTERIA.
References in periodicals archive ?
We had a high level of suspicion regarding the diagnosis of FD as the patient had first started to stutter at 12 years old, the fluency pathology of his speech was in the same mode and intonation, and he had an inappropriate lack of concern for his stuttering such as "la belle indifference" as seen in a conversion disorder.
In both our patients, the atypical onset age for stuttering and the presence of "la belle indifference" were the main reasons for suspicion.
]Bien heureusement, l'homme de lumiere eclairee ne se laisse pas decontenancer par la belle indifference de l'ecrivaine francaise et en homme courageux, temeraire et doue d'elegance, il revient a la charge et tente, par mille et un detours, de gagner son estime et son [beaucoup moins que] intime [beaucoup plus grand que].
The shift in scientific centers from East to the West had several reasons the most important of which were probably the atmosphere of la belle indifference among people of the region and concomitant beginning of the Renaissance and the Age of Enlightenment 3-5 in the West.
This belle indifference is neither disinterest nor bohemian ennui but rather the expression of the dissolution of any and every totalization.
"He was genuinely concerned about his hiccuping, which is far from la belle indifference that a patient with a conversion disorder would give you.
Symptoms of CD classically have a rapid onset with the patient exhibiting "la belle indifference," a peculiar state where the patient appears strangely calm and unconcerned in light of the troubling circumstances.
These increased levels of corticofugal output, where messages are directed away from the cerebral cortex, may inhibit afferent sensorimotor impulses leading to a diminished awareness of bodily sensation and could account for the manifested sensory deficits and la belle indifference.[3]
He presents instead 'La belle indifference' which is of diagnostic importance because, of course, loss of memory and wandering away may occur in other circumstances, as for example after an epileptic fit.
"Belle Indifference" syndrome was also tested so that the role of anxiety could be better understood in conversion reaction disorder and subsequently a better therapeutic programme could be formulated.