belladonna

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belladonna

 [bel″ah-don´ah]
Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade), a plant that is the source of numerous alkaloids, such as atropine and hyoscyamine.
the dried leaves and fruiting tops of this plant, used in the pharmacologic preparation of anticholinergic medications for treatment of peptic ulcer and other gastrointestinal disorders. Also known as belladonna leaf.
belladonna poisoning a severe toxic condition due to accidental or purposeful overdosage of belladonna. (Some herbal remedies and over the counter medications have it as an ingredient, or the plant or parts of it may be ingested.) Symptoms include dryness of the mouth, thirst, dilated pupils, flushed skin or rash on the face, neck, and upper trunk, tachycardia, fever, delirium, and stupor.

Treatment of belladonna poisoning will depend on the patient, dose, and route of administration. A poison control center or emergency services should be contacted immediately if poisoning occurs in the home. Airway maintenance, monitoring, administration of activated charcoal, and control of temperature will be done in the clinical setting.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bel·la·don·na

(bel'ă-don'ă),
Atropa belladonna (family Solanaceae); a perennial herb with dark or yellow purple flowers and shining purplish-black berries; the leaves (0.3% belladonna alkaloids) and root (0.5% belladonna alkaloids) orginally were sources of atropine scopalamine and related alkaloids, which are anticholinergic. Belladonna is used as a powder (0.3% belladonna alkaloids, calculated as hyoscyamine) and tincture in the treatment of diarrhea, asthma, colic, and hyperacidity.
Synonym(s): deadly nightshade
[It. bella, beautiful, + donna, lady]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

belladonna

(bĕl′ə-dŏn′ə)
n.
1. A poisonous perennial herb (Atropa belladonna) native to Eurasia and northern Africa and naturalized in parts of North America, having nodding, purplish-brown, bell-shaped flowers and glossy black berries. Also called deadly nightshade.
2. An alkaloidal extract or tincture derived from this plant and used in medicine.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

belladonna

Drug slang
A regional term for phencyclidine (PCP).
 
Herbal medicine
A perennial herb which is highly toxic if taken internally at full concentration; belladonna contains scopolamine and hyoscyamine, which are used as antispasmodics in mainstream medicine and for gout and rheumatism in herbal medicine.
 
Toxicity
Belladonna causes diarrhoea, dilated pupils, dry mouth, flushing, hallucinations, hypertension, incoordination, nausea, speech impairment, tachycardia, vision impairment, vomiting, coma, possibly death.

Homeopathy B
elladonna is used for conditions of abrupt onset, acute infections, cough, earache, fever, headaches, seizures, sore throat, teething in children, urinary tract infections.

Ophthalmology
Belladonna derivatives—e.g., homatropine eye drops—are instilled into the eye to dilate the pupil
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bel·la·don·na

(bel'ă-don'ă)
Atropa belladonna; a perennial herb with dark purple flowers and berries. Originally used as a source of atropine.
Synonym(s): deadly nightshade.
[It. bella, beautiful, + donna, lady]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

belladonna

A crude form of ATROPINE derived from the leaves and roots of the poisonous plant, Atropa belladonna . The term derives from the cosmetic use of the alkaloid to widen the pupils. Bella donna is Italian for beautiful woman.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

atropine 

An alkaloid obtained from the belladonna plant. It is an antimuscarinic drug. In the eye it acts as a mydriatic and as a cycloplegic. It paralyses the pupillary sphincter and the ciliary muscle by preventing the action of acetylcholine at the parasympathetic nerve endings. See acetylcholine; cycloplegia; mydriatic.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

bel·la·don·na

(bel'ă-don'ă)
Atropa belladonna (family Solanaceae); a perennial herb with dark or yellow purple flowers and shining purplish-black berries and tincture to treat diarrhea, asthma, colic, and hyperacidity.
[It. bella, beautiful, + donna, lady]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012