belief


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belief

 [bĕ-lēf´]
trust placed in a person or thing.
cultural b's shared statements that individuals in a cultural group hold as true. Cultural beliefs, which sometimes are expressed as proverbs, shape the values of a culture; these beliefs and values in turn affect that culture's practices. Cultural beliefs about health and illness influence health behavior and the significance of symptoms for an individual; for example, some people believe that cancer is sent by God while other people believe cancer is in part due to personal behavior and lifestyle.
References in classic literature ?
(I am speaking within the circle of conventional doctrines, not expressing my own beliefs.) This direction towards an object is commonly regarded as typical of every form of cognition, and sometimes of mental life altogether.
It seems to me to be derivative, and to consist largely in BELIEFS: beliefs that what constitutes the thought is connected with various other elements which together make up the object.
There may be coarse hypocrites, who consciously affect beliefs and emotions for the sake of gulling the world, but Bulstrode was not one of them.
Modern history has rejected the beliefs of the ancients without replacing them by a new conception, and the logic of the situation has obliged the historians, after they had apparently rejected the divine authority of the kings and the "fate" of the ancients, to reach the same conclusion by another road, that is, to recognize (1) nations guided by individual men, and (2) the existence of a known aim to which these nations and humanity at large are tending.
Belief is an emotion, an outward projection of an emotion.
The Establishment Clause guarantees that our government--national, state, and local, including schools shall not endorse nor support a particular religious belief, shall not impose one on people, even if a majority holds that belief.
BELIEF: WHAT IT MEANS TO BELIEVE AND WHY OUR CONVICTIONS ARE SO COMPELLING
From Degrees of Belief to Binary Beliefs: Lessons from Judgment-Aggregation Theory, FRANZ DIETRICH and CHRISTIAN LIST
Belief: What it Means to Believe and Why Our Convictions Are So Compelling provides a powerful focus on the psychology of beliefs and how they are formed and influenced, and is recommended for psychological and spirituality holdings alike.
Exploring the psychology of belief, Alcock discusses the power of belief, the belief engine, belief stability and change, knowing ourselves, belief in a world beyond, and vetting belief.