behaviourism

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behaviourism

(1) A school of psychology which holds that only overt (external) or observable behaviours can be reasonably analysed, and internal constructs (i.e., the mind, developmental stages, and psychoanalysis) are too subjective and intangible to be substantially examined. Modern behaviourism is exemplefied by BF Skinner’s school of operant conditioning.
(2) Behavioural intervention, see there.

be·hav·ior·ism

(bē-hāv'yŏr-izm)
A branch of psychology that formulates, through systematic observation and experimentation, the laws and principles that underlie the behavior of humans and animals; its major contributions have been made in the areas of conditioning andlearning.
Synonym(s): behavioral psychology, behaviourism.

behaviourism

an approach to psychology which studies and interprets behaviour by objective observation of that behaviour without regard to any subjective mental processes such as ideas, emotions and will. Instead, all behaviour is held to be governed by conditioned responses.
References in periodicals archive ?
With minor differences, the restricted CALL approach mirrors Warschauer's (1996) behaviouristic phase, yet Bax (2003) prefers the adjective restricted because it may refer to a number of restricted or limited dimensions of learning through CALL.
Despite the move from behaviouristic to constructivist theories of learning, traces of mechanistic theories of learning still remain in learning environments.
com), this approach suffers from its limitation to a purely behaviouristic perspective.
Some manifestations on behaviouristic resistance in Brazil.
This has led to a lack of development of new theory to explain phenomena and a preoccupation with, for example, controlled experimentation in artificial situations[33] and narrowly constrained consumer research with a focus on cognition within a behaviouristic context[34].
1989) suggest that consumer behaviour research has been so narrowly constrained by the notion of "behaviour" in a behaviouristic context that "the majority of contemporary consumer research should be more aptly labelled consumer cognition".
This kind of assumption reminds of humanistic psychology (as opposed to a behaviouristic psychology).
Yet in his discussion of charactertraits and virtues Brandt presupposes deterministic, and roughly behaviouristic principles, and recommends the inculcation of virtue by means of a kind of therapy with behavioural and cognitive elements.