behaviourism

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behaviourism

(1) A school of psychology which holds that only overt (external) or observable behaviours can be reasonably analysed, and internal constructs (i.e., the mind, developmental stages, and psychoanalysis) are too subjective and intangible to be substantially examined. Modern behaviourism is exemplefied by BF Skinner’s school of operant conditioning.
(2) Behavioural intervention, see there.
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be·hav·ior·ism

(bē-hāv'yŏr-izm)
A branch of psychology that formulates, through systematic observation and experimentation, the laws and principles that underlie the behavior of humans and animals; its major contributions have been made in the areas of conditioning andlearning.
Synonym(s): behavioral psychology, behaviourism.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Although there is a commercial learning system that is based on Knowledge Space Theory, which is the ALEKS system (http://www.aleks.com), this approach suffers from its limitation to a purely behaviouristic perspective.
(1989) suggest that consumer behaviour research has been so narrowly constrained by the notion of "behaviour" in a behaviouristic context that "the majority of contemporary consumer research should be more aptly labelled consumer cognition".
This kind of assumption reminds of humanistic psychology (as opposed to a behaviouristic psychology).
Of the six companies, two were found to have cultural characteristics that lead us to suggest that they are based on "behaviouristic" type assumptions[4, pp.
Yet in his discussion of charactertraits and virtues Brandt presupposes deterministic, and roughly behaviouristic principles, and recommends the inculcation of virtue by means of a kind of therapy with behavioural and cognitive elements.
This is made particularly clear by Tennant's discussion of the nature of meaning and its normativity, as well as by his strongly behaviouristic reading of the manifestation requirement.