behaviourism


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Related to behaviourism: Cognitivism

behaviourism

(1) A school of psychology which holds that only overt (external) or observable behaviours can be reasonably analysed, and internal constructs (i.e., the mind, developmental stages, and psychoanalysis) are too subjective and intangible to be substantially examined. Modern behaviourism is exemplefied by BF Skinner’s school of operant conditioning.
(2) Behavioural intervention, see there.

be·hav·ior·ism

(bē-hāv'yŏr-izm)
A branch of psychology that formulates, through systematic observation and experimentation, the laws and principles that underlie the behavior of humans and animals; its major contributions have been made in the areas of conditioning andlearning.
Synonym(s): behavioral psychology, behaviourism.

behaviourism

an approach to psychology which studies and interprets behaviour by objective observation of that behaviour without regard to any subjective mental processes such as ideas, emotions and will. Instead, all behaviour is held to be governed by conditioned responses.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, there are a number of potential dangers in relying on behaviourism in the training and development setting:
There is certainly an element of Orwell's 1984 in some of Skinner and Watson's suggested uses for behavioural techniques: people are stripped of their free will and responsibility, and human behaviour is reduced to a purely biological phenomenon, that can be shaped and manipulated by those able to use the tools of behaviourism.
Rather than basing much of your training on behaviourism (which comes from research on the behaviour of animals inside a box), you need to think outside the box and develop more responsive, integrated training philosophies that meet the needs of a diverse employee group.
The implications of behaviourism for trainers and training design.
The speculative behaviourism of the 1920s was generally viewed With embarrassment by those who would, under the influence of various developments in the logic of science both within and outside of the discipline, usher in a new era of neobehaviourism and behavioural science.
Recognizing that psychological behaviourism finds its most Complete expression in the ideology of the behaviour modification movement, Mills renders a fascinating account of the parallels between the history of the mental health movement in America and the history of behaviourism.
His careful exposition and interpretation of the course of behaviourism brings to bear the full weight of social criticism and philosophical reflection in an account that yet leaves the reader astonished at the distance between science and life.
Radical behaviourism and the sales interaction: a proposed theoretical framework
The subsequent analysis provides an examination of how radical behaviourism can be utilized to explain buying behaviour within the sales interaction context.
One of the most influential contributions to behaviourism has been the pioneering work done by B.
Behaviourism could only remain behaviourism as long as its subject matter was limited to what we normally call behaviour: 'what an organism is doing, or more accurately what it is observed by another organism to be doing' (Skinner, 1938, p.
In conclusion, it seems fair to say that no fundamental difference, only different terminology, and prejudice, no doubt, stands between the unity of radical behaviourism and cognitive psychology.