behaviourism

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Related to behavioristic: behavioristic psychology

behaviourism

(1) A school of psychology which holds that only overt (external) or observable behaviours can be reasonably analysed, and internal constructs (i.e., the mind, developmental stages, and psychoanalysis) are too subjective and intangible to be substantially examined. Modern behaviourism is exemplefied by BF Skinner’s school of operant conditioning.
(2) Behavioural intervention, see there.

be·hav·ior·ism

(bē-hāv'yŏr-izm)
A branch of psychology that formulates, through systematic observation and experimentation, the laws and principles that underlie the behavior of humans and animals; its major contributions have been made in the areas of conditioning andlearning.
Synonym(s): behavioral psychology, behaviourism.

behaviourism

an approach to psychology which studies and interprets behaviour by objective observation of that behaviour without regard to any subjective mental processes such as ideas, emotions and will. Instead, all behaviour is held to be governed by conditioned responses.
References in periodicals archive ?
One example of a behavioristic model is the cumulative effects (CE) model (described on pp.
The argument went that a nominal stimulus "out there" (per behavioristic stimulus-response theory) was a source of information that was encoded (by behavers), "transmitted," then decoded, whereupon acts were selected and generated.
He also recognizes that these aspects explain why pragmatism could, in the hands first of James and Mead, and then of Dewey and Morris, become increasingly antiintentional, behavioristic, and ethically irrelevant.
More specifically pertinent here is what the brain data have to say about behavioristic covert processes.
A functional behavioristic approach to aversively motivated behavior Predatory imminence as a determinant of the topography of defensive behavior.
12) I shall ignore Norman Malcolm-style behavioristic analyses of dreaming in which it is claimed that any talk concerning dreams which have occurred but have been forgotten is utterly devoid of meaning.
According to Roediger, "Anywhere that prediction and control of overt behavior are critical, one finds behavioristic analyses at work" (p.
The book under review here is the latest of a series in which Uttal offers contemporary theorizing in behavioristic thinking about the role of the brain in psychology in general and the mind in particular.
For example, even in one of his earliest treatments, in which psychological events are described as conscious behavior, he wrote, "The specific, behavioristic factors are the three predominately physiological functions, the muscular, the glandular and the organic.
Kantor's field-theoretical psychology finds no place for either the determinism of psychodynamic and behavioristic approaches or the self-actional conceptions of those seeking to avoid treating humans as automatons pushed and pulled about by lineally operating causes.
1983, 1985) has raised a number of incisive concerns about the behavioristic approach.