behaviorist


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Related to behaviorist: Animal behaviorist

be·hav·ior·ist

(bē-hāv'yōr-ist),
An adherent of behaviorism.

be·hav·ior·ist

(bē-hāv'yŏr-ist)
A person who supports or practices behaviorism.
References in periodicals archive ?
experimental behaviorist inquiry for many decades (see Thyer, 1992).
Shifting from behaviorist to constructivist teaching required more time for student interactions and communications.
The best comment about behaviorism is the old joke about the two behaviorists after they just had sex.
But if, as Mills notes with some irony, "Watson's animal work shows no trace of a behaviorist position" (p.
"When the 25 million American homes come to realize that the child has a right to a separate room and adequate psychological care there will not be nearly so many children born," the behaviorist added smugly.
Most trainers condition animals by using positive reinforcement, rewarding an animal for doing something correctly, says animal behaviorist Bailey.
In cases that cannot be managed in collaboration with your veterinarian, it may be worthwhile to consult with a veterinary behaviorist. (You can find board-certified veterinary behaviorists at the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists website at www.dacvb.org.)
If you want to improve his behavior, you should seek a board-certified veterinary behaviorist. The American College of Veterinary Behaviorists lists diplomates at acvb.org.
Worth are two of the most dog-friendly cities in the US, we felt dog owners in these cities needed somewhere they can go to get help, even when they do not have the money to hire a trainer or behaviorist,” said Juan Faura, the host of Paw Talk.
Dennehy III voted to euthanize the dog against the recommendations of animal behaviorist Philip W.
The two dimensions (subscales) were characterized as constructivist, and behaviorist, and are orthogonal to each other.