behavioral marital therapy

behavioral marital therapy

a form of marital therapy using principles and techniques from behavior therapy; it attempts to alleviate marital distress by increasing positive, pleasant interactions between the couple.
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Predicting who will benefit from behavioral marital therapy.
Reinforcement erosion is a term coined by the developers of Behavioral Marital Therapy (Jacobson & Margolin, 1979) to refer to processes such as satiation and habituation through which previously reinforcing stimuli become less reinforcing over time.
Baucom and colleagues attempted to examine whether cognitive restructuring and emotional processing would enhance behavioral marital therapy (Baucom, Sayers, & Slier, 1990).
Behavioral interventions, including community reinforcement, behavioral contracting, behavioral marital therapy, skills training, chemical aversion therapy, covert sensitization, and self-control training, also ranked in the top 20 of all treatment modalities (Miller and Wilbourne 2002).
Clinical significance of improvement resulting from two behavioral marital therapy components.
Focusing on alcohol use in the family, combined with behavioral marital therapy, was found to be significantly helpful to alcoholics and their spouses.
Other therapies that have been evaluated and found effective in reducing alcohol problems include brief intervention for alcohol abusers (individuals who are not dependent on alcohol) and behavioral marital therapy for married alcohol-dependent individuals.
Several other broad-spectrum alcoholism treatment approaches exist, including the community-reinforcement approach (CRA), behavioral marital therapy (BMT), behavioral self-control training (BSCT), and relaxation training.
Bridging theory and practice: A comparative analysis of Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Marital Therapy.
The program evaluates the additive effects of teaching spousal support of drinking moderation and of behavioral marital therapy in a drinking-moderation program.
An excellent example of this process of rediscovery can be found in the evolution of traditional behavioral marital therapy (Jacobson & Margolin, 1979) into its current manifestation as integrative couple therapy (Christensen & Jacobson, 1991; Jacobson & Christensen, 1998).
Jacobson (1992) presents a significant modification of traditional behavioral marital therapy with Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy, an approach that emphasizes idiographic assessment and strives for a balance of acceptance and change strategies based on this assessment.
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