bedtime

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bedtime

The time at which a person first tries to fall asleep—as distinguished from the time when a person gets into bed.

bedtime

Sleep disorders The time when one attempts to fall asleep–as distinguished from the time when one gets into bed
References in periodicals archive ?
Bedtimes should be determined by several factors, such as when the child has to wake up based on the time it takes for that child to get ready for school, and the time it takes to get to school, as well as the school start time.
Bedtimes: When crossing two-three time zones, attempt to keep your child awake until his normal bedtime hour.
ISLAMABAD -- Parents who put babies to sleep in their own rooms report the infants get more rest and have more consistent bedtime routines than parents who share a room or a bed with their babies, a recent study suggests.
She and her coauthors focused on bedtimes because they have a greater impact on the duration of sleep than do wake times, over which parents have less control.
Three of the mothers who described television only right before their preschoolers' bedtimes, seemed to use it to aid with sleep onset.
The researchers linked preschoolers' bedtimes to obesity when the kids were teens, at an average age of 15.
Bedtimes are yet another modifiable routine that may help to prevent obesity, and pediatricians should not only encourage early ones, but, as the study authors put it, "support parents in their efforts to overcome the barriers they face in implementing this routine."
"The results are important because they highlight adolescent bedtimes, not just total sleep time, as a potential target for weight management concurrently and in the transition to adulthood," first author Lauren Asarnow, a doctoral candidate at the University of California, Berkeley, said in a news release from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
Previous research has found that children with irregular bedtimes perform worse on tests in reading, math and spatial awareness than those with stable bedtimes.
Erratic bedtimes can cause a similar effect to jet lag and the longer youngsters go without regular bedtimes, the greater the impact on their behaviour, experts found.
Irregular bedtimes can increase the risk of behavioural problems in children, researchers reveal.
The Results: At all ages children with regular bedtimes had fewer behavioral problems than those with irregular bedtimes.