bedside commode


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bedside commode

A portable toilet that enables a patient to sit comfortably while defecating or urinating. For many patients using a bedside commode is less stressful than using a bedpan. Using a bedside commode also reduces the risk of the Valsalva maneuver, which is more likely to occur when using a bedpan.
See also: commode
References in periodicals archive ?
"I think it's easier if the person who has the diarrhea can go to the bathroom and eliminate the bowel movement, rather than use a bedside commode," Griffin said.
For example, a child may not exceed weight limits for a standard bedside commode, but may be unable to use a standard device because of the width of his or her hips.
Mobility's AirLift is reportedly easy to install and gently lowers and lifts people on and off a standard toilet or bedside commode by using patented air-strut technology, eliminating the need for electricity.
was asked frequently if she needed to use the bedside commode. The thyroid panel and TSI were drawn.
There are some bedside commodes that are self-cleaning.
was put on best rest with privileges to the bedside commode. Thromboguards to prevent deep vein thrombosis were prescribed to be worn at all times while in bed.
For example, what might seem to be a small nuance of decline in a resident's ability to transfer to the bedside commode in the middle of the night potentially translates into an increase of more than $45 per day in reimbursement at the Rehab Ultra-High level--if the right people find out about it.
Hitcho and associates (2004) found patient falls occurred primarily while ambulating (19.1%), getting out of bed (10.9%), sitting down or standing up (9.3%), using a bedside commode or toileting (4.4%), standing or sitting without trying any other actions (3.8%), reaching for an object (3.3%), sleeping or repositioning in bed (2.2%), getting into bed (1.1%), using the bathtub (0.5%), and dressing or undressing (0.5%), or for "unknown" reasons (33.3%).
* Environmental factors and assistive devices that may restrict or facilitate a resident's ability to access the toilet, such as grab bars, raised or low toilet seats, inadequate lighting, distance to the toilet or bedside commode, availability of urinals, use of bed rails or restraints, or fear of falling and;
Once you identify when a given resident will most likely need to urinate, you can plan strategies: e.g., making sure the resident has access to a toilet or bedside commode at that time, or perhaps making a bedpan available before the resident leaves bed in the morning.
Mobility, Inc., has introduced the AirLift bedside commode, part of the AirLift line of toileting systems.
Activity Percent Awake in bed, little or no movement 42.4 Awake in bed, moderate movement 21.6 Sleeping quietly 15.9 Missing 4.5 Other 3.8 Eating 3.1 Awake in bed, agitated 2.3 Sleeping fitfully 2.1 Sitting in chair, moderate movement 1.4 Receiving treatment (passive, painless) 0.9 Receiving treatment (some discomfort) 0.9 Using toilet 0.3 Walking slowly 0.3 Walking with crutches, walker or other device 0.2 Sitting in chair, little or no movement 0.2 Using bedside commode 0.1 Bedside and centrally recorded values for pulse rates, heart rates, and oxygen saturation were very similar.