patient

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patient

 [pa´shent]
a person who is ill or is undergoing treatment for disease. There is considerable debate regarding the appropriate use of this term. In some institutional settings it is not used because it is thought to denote a dependent relationship on the part of the person undergoing treatment. The words client, resident, and at times guest can also be used to refer to a person receiving treatment.
p's rights those rights attributed to a person seeking health care. In 1973 the American Hospital Association approved a statement called the “Patient's Bill of Rights,” regarding a patient's rights during hospitalization. (A revised document was subsequently approved in 1992.) This was published with the expectation that observance of patient's rights would contribute to more effective care and greater satisfaction for the patient, health care providers, and the hospital organization in general. Although it is recognized that a personal relationship between the health care provider and the patient is essential for provision of care, legal precedent has established that the hospital itself also has a responsibility to the patient.

In general, the rights of a patient are concerned with the patient being fully informed about his or her illness, the diagnostic and therapeutic measures anticipated, and the written records of the care received. The patient has the right to considerate and respectful care, delivered in response to a request for services and in a manner that provides continuity of care. In regard to payment for services, the patient has the right to examine and receive an explanation of the bill regardless of source of payment.

pa·tient

(pā'shĕnt),
One who is suffering from any disease or behavioral disorder and is under treatment for it. Compare: case.
[L. patiens, pres. p. of patior, to suffer]

patient

(pā′shənt)
adj.
Bearing or enduring pain, difficulty, provocation, or annoyance with calmness.
n.
One who receives medical attention, care, or treatment.

pa′tient·ly adv.

patient

EBM
A person with a  medical condition who participates in a clinical trial. Often used synonymously with subject, though not all subjects in a clinical trial are patients (may also include healthy volunteers).

Medspeak
A person under a physician's care for a particular disease or condition.

patient

Medtalk A person receiving health care. See Crossover patient, Difficult patient, Expectant patient, Good patient, Index patient, Negative patient, Noncompliant patient, Orphan patient, Outpatient, Private patient, Problem patient, Professional patient, Qualified patient, Qualifying patient, Service patient, Standardized patient, Violent/combative patient, Wandering patient.

pa·tient

(pā'shĕnt)
One who is suffering from disease, injury, an abnormal state, or a mental disorder, and is engaged in related treatment.
Compare: case (1) , client
[L. patiens, pres. p. of patior, to suffer]

patient 

Term originating from the Latin patior meaning to suffer; one who suffers or is ill and requires treatment.

pa·tient

(pā'shĕnt)
Any person suffering from any disease or behavioral disorder and undergoing treatment for it.
Compare: case
[L. patiens, pres. p. of patior, to suffer]

Patient discussion about patient

Q. Over-medication” for bipolar patients. Does anyone have any information on “over-medication” for bipolar patients? About any societies that is overdependence on drugs or medicines to treat bipolar disorder?

A. pharmaceutical drugs can be of great help when the disease breaks out. but in the moment that the person is again under control, you should find out the causes and cure them one after another. psychosis, schizophrenia, paranoia break out, because your emotional body can't keep all traumata anymore under control. the last body - the physical body will react out of control because too many emotions have not been assimilated in time. kineology is here of great help to analyse and eliminate one cause after another. detoxication is another thing which must be considered. healthy food - biological food, source water (still water) - each case needs individual help.

Q. how long is a patient diagnosed with diverticulitis stay in the hospital How long is the observation period a patient diagnosed with diverticulitis

A. Simple diverticulitis may be treated as outpatient without hospitalization. Complicated cases are usually admitted and treated with antibiotics for several days.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/MEDLINEPLUS/ency/article/000257.htm

Q. I need to know when do the patient require hospitalization for bipolar? Hello everyone, I need to know when do the patient require hospitalization for bipolar and what are the factors decide on the duration of their stay?

A. There are many factors that can lead to hospitalization. It can be simply that the patient needs to be monitored while their medications are tweaked. It may be because the patient is in risk of harming themselves, or someone else. It may be that the patient is manic to a point where they may harm themselves. The stay in the hospital will also very depending on their symptoms and how quickly they can be controlled with medications and theropy. Sometimes a hospital stay could be very good for the patient and has often been a factor in saving lives.

More discussions about patient
References in periodicals archive ?
For bedridden patients, patients with superficial wounds who live in myiasis-endemic areas, or patients who undergo a tracheostomy or have open wounds, health workers and caregivers should consider preventive care of wounds, which are risk factors for myiasis infection.
Many of the jobs humans would like robots to perform, such as packing items in warehouses, assisting bedridden patients, or aiding soldiers on the front lines, aren't yet possible because robots still don't recognize and easily handle common objects.
This simple invention helps to avoid the need of catheters that are a known cause for infections, and during this short testing it has already detected acute dehydration cases that have saved the lives of bedridden patients. I am aware there are many solutions to be implemented; this is why I always try to motivate raw material suppliers, manufacturers, and OEMs to think out of the box.
"We have seen oversized bath wipe products created for the elderly or bedridden patients becoming popular with younger consumers who frequent outdoor festivals, concerts and events," says Cali Carter, marketing coordinator at Chino, Calif.-based Diamond Wipes International Inc., a wet wipes converter.
Murashko NK, 2012, Stages of kinetotherapy and therapeutic massage for long time bedridden patients, Abstract
Are failing to take observations and administer medications on time, inability to turn bedridden patients two hourly, skipping hygiene cares, inability to mobilise patients regularly, failing to provide comprehensive patient education, not answering call bells, all too familiar aspects of too many nurses' shifts, too often?
Totally dependent on others, my wife received every kindness and care from a dedicated staff looking after helpless, bedridden patients, a large number of whom were suffering from dementia.
[sup][3] The characteristics of AHRU are sudden-onset, painless, and massive anal bleeding in bedridden patients with severe underlying disease, as is the case in most patients in the ICU.
After authorities arrived, the bedridden patients were transported by ambulance to other care centers or a hospital.
One such unnamed talent is Thomas Casson''s energised portrayal of a hospital administrator - shades of Basil Fawlty - facing the chop after convict volunteer workers steal computers and bedridden patients escape on mobility scooters.
Pressure ulcers are a high-risk, high-volume, and high-cost problem for hospitalized and bedridden patients. Overall pressure ulcer prevalence rates have been reported at 12.3 percent across all facilities, with prevalence being highest in long-term acute care facilities (22%), and facility-acquired prevalence being highest in adult intensive care units (8.8%-10.3%) [1].