bedewing

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bedewing

Clouding of vision resulting from edema of the cornea.
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References in periodicals archive ?
I looked between Its iron bars; and saw it lie, My garden, mine, beneath the sky, Pied with all flowers bedewed and green: From bough to bough the song-birds crossed, From flower to flower the moths and bees; With all its nests and stately trees It had been mine, and it was lost.
In his letter the journalist quoted Kashmiri people as saying, ' The Valley is bedewed in blood of Kashmiris as more than 10,000 Kashmiris are badly injured by pellet guns; more than 500 have lost their eyes forever.
Such decorated stones provide a contrast to the last one described, which is a "rough gray stone" only bearing the initials "S.L." and a date: "This humble memorial, wrought painfully by Grief herself, and doubtless bedewed with tears, was more honourable both to the mourner and the dead, than the costliest monument that ever was bought and sold" ("Martha's Vineyard" 118).
To ride their horses and take away their possessions, to see the faces of those who were dear to them bedewed with tears, and to clasp their wives and daughters in his arms"; quoted in Steven Dutch, "The Mongols" (1998), accessed online at: http://www.uwgb.edu/dutchs/WestTech/xmongol.htm.
Through my 105-mm refractor at 68x, NGC 2324 emerges as a pretty web of mist bedewed with a smattering of very faint stars.
We were captivated by her reticence as she stood outside her home, breasts to her knees, a can in one hand, a cigarette in another, as she bedewed the pavement with expletives.
"At these words this same brother wept and sighed, bedewed his sad cheeks with floods of tears.
(9) Clearly, the 'taxonomy of the sublime' (10) that characterises early New Zealand writing, in which the bedewed, starry, silent, and shining landscape is peopled by an ethereal array of fairies, nymphs, sprites and goblins did little to satiate the new generation's appetite for the real.
Why should readers whose interests dictated the ideological maintenance of their material privileges acclaim the greatest enemy of mankind, "that robber thus with gore bedewed," and hence help "turn what some deem danger to delight"?
Note the insistence on the concept of weight, as observed in "pondus," "grauatum," and "pondere." (35) A further interesting case is offered by Riddle 89 (strigilis aenea), which describes a bronze strigil used for removing dirt and sweat from the skin in a bathhouse: "Robida, curua, capax, alienis humida guttis ..." [Ruddy, curved, capacious, bedewed with strange drops (i.e., somebody else's drops of sweat)] (1).
Perperia, all fresh bedewed Freshen all the neighbourhood; by the woods, on the highway.