sea cucumber

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Related to beche-de-mer: bêche-de-mer

sea cucumber

A cylindrical marine invertebrate of the family Holothuria; some species have tentacles that contain a mild venom. Contact with the organism may produce dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Frank Moorhouse had been sent on the expedition by the Queensland Government specifically to study beche-de-mer, trochus and sponges.
Mussard, "A new study of asexual reproduction in holothurian: fission in Holothuria leucospilota populations on Reunion Island in Indian Ocean," SPC Beche-de-Mer Information Bulletin, vol.
Ushimura, "Observation of asexual reproduction by natural fission of Stichopus horrens Selenka in Okinawa Island, Japan," SPC Beche-de-mer Information Bulletin, vol.
Hassan, "isheries status and management plan for Saudi Arabian sea cucumbers," SPC Beche-de-Mer Information Bulletin, vol.
There are 21 vessels, or 'company boats' as they are called, worked by the natives, in the pearl-shell and beche-de-mer industry, on the communal system.
From 1915 company boats began to focus more on the trochus industry, but boats shifted between pearl-shell, trochus and beche-de-mer depending on price and seasonal conditions, even though each product required quite different collecting and processing techniques.
Beche-de-mer is exported from the producer countries to a central market such as Hong Kong or Singapore, and then is re-exported to Chinese consumers.
Beche-de-mer fisheries have a long history, as the Chinese have sought sea cucumbers for a thousand years or more in India, Indonesia, and the Philippines (Conand, 1986, 1989a, 1990).
Review of the beche-de-mer (sea cucumber) fishery in the Maldives, Programme Officer, Bay of Bengal Programme (April 1992).
Evidence for a marked decline of bechede-mer populations in the Suva and Beqa areas of Fiji, and apreliminary description of a method of identifying beche-de-mer individuals based on characteristic-body wrinkles.
The beche-de-mer, trochus and pearl-shell fisheries continued to be the backbone of the region's economy, but the workforce became more ethnically mixed and included Europeans, Japanese, Malayans, Pacific Islanders and Torres Strait Islanders, as well as Aborigines and Papuans.
"Preparing beche-de-mer for export." Fisheries, Inc., P.O.