castor

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castor

(kăs′tər)
n.
An oily, brown, odorous substance obtained from glands in the groin of the beaver and used as a perfume fixative.
References in classic literature ?
The Beaver, who happened to hear the remark, Protested, with tears in its eyes, That not even the rapture of hunting the Snark Could atone for that dismal surprise!
The Beaver's best course was, no doubt, to procure A second-hand dagger-proof coat-- So the Baker advised it-- and next, to insure Its life in some Office of note:
Yet still, ever after that sorrowful day, Whenever the Butcher was by, The Beaver kept looking the opposite way, And appeared unaccountably shy.
He came as a Butcher: but gravely declared, When the ship had been sailing a week, He could only kill Beavers. The Bellman looked scared, And was almost too frightened to speak:
"So it would seem, Three Eagles," Grey Beaver answered, lying his hand on the cub; "and this be the sign of it."
Then Grey Beaver took a knife from a sheath that hung around his neck, and went into the thicket and cut a stick.
He came upon one of the man-animals, Grey Beaver, who was squatting on his hams and doing something with sticks and dry moss spread before him on the ground.
Women and children were carrying more sticks and branches to Grey Beaver. It was evidently an affair of moment.
A few beavers were taken every night, and salmon trout of a small size, so that the camp had principally to subsist upon dried buffalo meat.
Food was given to both; they skulked about the camp like hungry hounds, seeking what they might devour, and having gathered up the feet and entrails of some beavers that were lying about, slunk off with them to their den among the rocks.
As the Indians moved away in a body, and with a step that would have been inaudible to the ears of any common man, the same venerable-looking beaver once more ventured his head from its cover.
Instead of taking the path which led directly toward the camp of the Delawares, Magua led his party for some distance down the windings of the stream, and along the little artificial lake of the beavers. The day began to dawn as they entered the clearing which had been formed by those sagacious and industrious animals.