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bear

(bâr)
n.
a. Any of various usually omnivorous mammals of the family Ursidae that have a shaggy coat and a short tail and walk with the entire lower surface of the foot touching the ground.
b. Any of various other animals, such as the koala, that resemble a true bear.
(1) A subculture in gay/bisexual male communities with events, codes and culture-specific identity that hinge around a hypermasculine identity
(2) A member of a subculture of gay/bisexual males who is hairy and often bearded. Some bears have embraced transgendered as well as non-gendered individuals
References in periodicals archive ?
The Memory trace is at once collective and individual, vertical and horizontal, communitarian and cosmopolitan, unmovable and mobile, as well as fragile, whereas the monument always bears witness to the entrenched, vertical authority of the dominant power.
The situation has changed considerably, as this collection bears witness. Of the eleven contributions in it, three fall under the rubric of "The Sermon as Genre" (Catholic, Lutheran, Reformed), seven under "The Social History of Preaching" (divided according countries or areas), and the last under "Preaching and the Geography of Reformations." Literary and doctrinal considerations of course occur in these pieces, but they are not the dominant ones.
One who bears witness will do so even when a search for justice seems futile.
The exhibition bears witness to the global character of the movement, which could be found in cities as far apart as Shanghai, Bombay, Paris, New York, Sydney and Brazil.
At the same time we give thanks for the rescue workers and volunteers, and all those persons whose courageous efforts demonstrated a generosity and selflessness that bears witness to the spirit of our nation at its best.
The reader bears witness to a young woman's struggle to run away from herself and her history and begin anew on her own terms, only to be faced at every turn with reminders of her true identity.
The arid space that covers the scene of this tragedy today bears witness to nothing more than the unsystematic and hasty reconstruction of the city.
Ursa uses the blues to compensate for her inability to "make generations" by producing "generations in song and using "her mouth as her mother and grandmothers used their wombs," creating in effect in the blues a "surrogate daughter who bears witness" to Corregidora's legacy (duCille, "Phallus(ies)" 568).