bear

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bear

(bâr)
n.
a. Any of various usually omnivorous mammals of the family Ursidae that have a shaggy coat and a short tail and walk with the entire lower surface of the foot touching the ground.
b. Any of various other animals, such as the koala, that resemble a true bear.
(1) A subculture in gay/bisexual male communities with events, codes and culture-specific identity that hinge around a hypermasculine identity
(2) A member of a subculture of gay/bisexual males who is hairy and often bearded. Some bears have embraced transgendered as well as non-gendered individuals
References in periodicals archive ?
These are actions that arise from bearing witness. The time for deciphering, fact-finding, decision-making will come in due course because there is a time for everything under the sun.
Bernie Glassman, Bearing Witness: A Zen Master's Lessons in Making Peace, (New York: Bell Tower, 1998), 67-73.
At the time of Anzaldua's death, they were co-editing Bearing Witness, Reading Lives: Imagination, Creativity, and Cultural Change.
In this last section, Lynn Berry offers a particularly provocative assessment of the tone and content of Pierre Boucher's 1664 natural history of Canada as bearing witness t o the personal "hybridization" of this twenty-seven-year resident of Canada, and the discursive "hybridization" of his representation of Canada's flora and fauna (224, 227).
Bearing witness is an especially heroic--and costly--form of personal activism.
Finet, "During the retreat, Christ the Light of the world is revealed, a light which is taught and a light which is lived by the whole community bearing witness together."
He also wrote to British military chaplains serving in the Persian Gulf, telling them, "You stand in a long and honourable tradition of Christians bearing witness to the love of Christ in hard and dangerous places."
Bearing witness to such events and seeing commanding officers turn a blind eye turns closeted straight-looking soldiers into silent coconspirators, Hill says.