bearing surface


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weight-bearing surface

An orthopaedic term for those areas of the hip joint which support the most weight—e.g., the superior surface of the femoral head and the superior surface of the acetabulum.

bearing surface

The region in a joint where opposing structures make contact, rub against each other, and transmit compressive forces.
See also: surface
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, we reviewed a series of 43 adolescent patients with osteochondral fracture that did not involve the bearing surface after patellar dislocation and compared the outcomes of patients undergoing internal fixation with that of patients without fixation.
So, the indication of a metal-bearing surface is questionable given the higher rate of early RHA compared to other bearing surfaces such as polyethylene or ceramic.
One might think that it would be easy to develop the ideal bearing surfaces for hip replacement.
In this study cancer rates in patients with metal-on-metal hip replacements were compared with both a group of patients who had other hip bearing surfaces implanted and the general population.
Ceramics including alumina have been used as a bearing surface in total hip replacements for over 35 years.
Bearing surface is just one of several choices surgeons make when performing total knee arthroplasty.
As with the entire Champion hammer line, the RC45 uses an interchangeable choke that gives the flexibility to tune the hammer to best meet drilling needs, a hardened non-ported reversible piston case that is extremely durable and a long piston bearing surface to maintain peak operating pressure.
As the polders' subsoil is swampy and has low bearing power, we came up with the principle of an inversed cone, driven into the ground down to its rim, as bearing surface. The cone was to be filled with water, as any excavation in a swampy soil would naturally be.
Because of the process and technology of implant production, the ceramic liner was not a continuous smooth surface, but rather one with hard edges at the margin of the bearing surface that sat a couple of millimeters recessed from the face of the implant.[sup][49] The friction pairs were uniformly forced when the femoral head moved normally inside the liner.
I have run across the assumption many times that reduced bearing surface between the hot-drop tip and the cavity steel is desirable to minimize heat transfer.