bearing surface


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weight-bearing surface

An orthopaedic term for those areas of the hip joint which support the most weight—e.g., the superior surface of the femoral head and the superior surface of the acetabulum.

bearing surface

The region in a joint where opposing structures make contact, rub against each other, and transmit compressive forces.
See also: surface
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the impingement also increased the chance of mismatch and edge loading, resulting in further damage of the bearing surfaces.
The differences in age, weight and function demand of patients have helped drive the development of so many different types of bearing surfaces on the market.
The development of alternate bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty (THA) has emerged due to the need to decrease prosthetic component wear, to improve component longevity, and to reduce the risk of revision surgery.
Following unsuccessful attempts that included interposition of materials such as ivory, gold foil, glass, stainless-steel, acrylic and ceramic between the joint bearing surfaces to relieve pain, in 1938 Philip Wiles at the Middlesex Hospital, London undertook the first prosthetic joint replacement (Wiles 1958).
Bearing surface is just one of several choices surgeons make when performing total knee arthroplasty.
Too little bearing surface contributes to many issues with vents closing off and parting burrs on cavity edges, and it can stress shutoffs as the tool coins in.
6-8) Yet even with reports of no aseptic loosening at 10 or 15 years post-implantation, wear of the bearing surface remains a serious threat to not only the long-term stability of the implant but to bone loss should revision arthroplasty be needed.
As a result, over 50% of physicians surveyed used more than one type of acetabular bearing surface to reflect the needs of their patients.
Bearing makers index bearing surface speeds by multiplying bearing diameter times rotation rate for a number they call DN.
One issue not mentioned in Mike's article is bullet bearing surface length and case neck length.