battered woman


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battered woman

A woman who has been physically or sexually assaulted by her husband, partner, or former partner. Typically verbal abuse precedes physical violence. An escalating pattern of intimidation and injury often results, sometimes ending in death. Frequently women are reluctant to report this type of abuse because they feel trapped or isolated. Women from any socioeconomic level may be affected. Shelters and support for battered women are available in many locations.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Willoughby, Comment, Rendering Each Woman Her Due: Can a Battered Woman Claim Self-Defense When She Kills Her Sleeping Batterer?, 38 U.
He objects to BWS as the key to justice because it depicts battered woman as impaired beings rather than rational actors responding to danger, and because it is unjust to excuse deadly use of force on the basis of a psychological impairment.
Schopp questions the validity of the battered woman syndrome, as well as its relevance to battered women's self-defense claims.
But the emergence of the battered woman syndrome defense has stirred up a heated debate and a plethora of scholarship.
With the advent of battered woman syndrome, battered child syndrome, black rage, and other abuse excuses, psychological expert testimony has changed in terms of admissibility, scope, and application to situations other than competency and insanity.(48)
(9) The psychological theory is often credited to Lenore Walker, a clinical and forensic psychologist whose book, The Battered Woman Syndrome, coined the term.
(33) In states that allow such evidence, the defendant must explain to the jury how her status as a battered woman influenced her perceptions of imminent danger and the need to use deadly force.
Bruce Winick describes the ideal domestic violence court judge as one who "avoids a paternalistic approach, treats the defendant with dignity and respect, displays good faith and a sense of caring, and listens attentively to whatever the defendant has to say" and creatively participates in the defendant's rehabilitative efforts through "the application of judicial praise and encouragement for positive compliance and sanctions for failure to comply." (97) Yet, for a battered woman who has struggled for years to end the cycle of abuse, it could be harmful to witness such a judicial attitude that praise and positive reinforcement alone can change a batterer's behavior.
This third edition presents data generated from the newly modified Battered Woman Syndrome Questionnaire.
Finding herself on the run, a battered woman may grab basics for her children, but will leave her own things behind, including personal care items.
This report describes the successful hypnotic intervention with a battered woman who has post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Discussing battered woman's syndrome and its place in court cases, "Women Who Kill" is an intriguing look in what can drive women to extremes.