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bat

(bat),
A member of the mammalian order Chiroptera.
[M.E. bakke]

bat

(băt)
n.
Any of various nocturnal flying mammals of the order Chiroptera, having membranous wings that extend from the forelimbs to the hind limbs or tail and anatomical adaptations for echolocation, by which they navigate and hunt prey.

bat

A family of small flying mammals, order Chiroptera.
 
Bat pathogens
Duvenhage virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, Kasokero virus, Mokola virus, Lyssavirus, rabies, salmonellosis, Yuli virus.

BAT

Abbreviation for:
behavioural avoidance test
Bivalirudin Angioplasty Trial
blood alcohol testing
blunt abdominal trauma
Breath Alcohol Technician
brown adipose tissue

Bivalirudin Angioplasty Trial  A trial comparing bivalirudin/Angiomax to heparin in patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) for unstable angina.
 
Primary endpoint
In-hospital death, acute MI, target lesion revascularisation.
 
Conclusion
Post-PTCA for unstable angina, ASA and bivalirudin/Angiomax has fewer cardiac and haemorrhagic in-hospital events than ASA and heparin; post-PCI infusion of antithrombotics was used in both study groups.

Logistics
Randomised, double-blinded; 4315 patients—2151 heparin + aspirin, 2161 bivalirudin + aspirin.

BAT

Blunt abdominal trauma. See Blunt trauma.

BAT

Abbreviation for breath alcohol technician.

BAT

Abbrev for brown adipose tissue.

bat

a flying mammal of the order CHIROPTERA, the only true flying vertebrate apart from the birds.

bat


Australian bat lyssavirus disease
a disease identified in 1996 in Australian fruit-eating flying foxes (Pteropus spp.) in which it is presumed endemic and in which it may cause encephalitis; the virus, of the genus Lyssavirus and the family Rhabdoviridae, has also caused fatal rabies-like illness in persons working closely with infected bats.
bat rabies
caused by rabies-like viruses which are antigenically similar to the classical rabies rhabdovirus. Bats also are common carriers of rabies virus transmitting it to other species and between themselves both by bite and by aerosol inhalation of urine. See also lagos and mokola viruses.
References in periodicals archive ?
The hydraulic valves operate on their own, uttering a disconcertingly human-sounding "tut-tut" that circles the church several times at increasing speed, metamorphosing into a tiny bird- or batlike flutter: a Holy Spirit flight simulator?
The last words of Davin's story sang in his memory and the figure of the woman in the story stood forth, reflected in other figures of the peasant women whom he had seen standing in doorways at Clane as the college cars drove by, as a type of her race and his own, a batlike soul waking to the consciousness of itself in darkness and secrecy and loneliness and, through the eyes and voice and gesture of a woman without guile, calling the stranger to her bed.
its SR-71 Blackbird drone; and the Pentagon, its F-117 Stealth fighter, which-along with other "black" aircraft like the robotic Aurora, the titanium-alloy Orient Express, the batlike Black Manta and the whale-shaped flying Shamu, plus the usual red darters, orange orbs and green magnesium flares dropped by test pilots to decoy heat-seeking missiles and the usual MIG Ferrets picked up at an Israeli swap meet -- are likely to be what ufologists have actually seen in the desert night sky, when they aren't just stoned on crystal meth.
By far the most appealing and heart-rending part of Flughunde (which are batlike creatures that can hear what we cannot) belongs to Helga and her siblings, with their childlike games in the midst of destruction and their helplessness in grasping the earthquake they are living through and which will soon swallow them up.
He sees the peasant seductress of Davin's story as "a type of her race and his own, a batlike soul waking to the consciousness of itself in darkness and secrecy and loneliness and, through the eyes and voice and gesture of a woman without guile, calling the stranger to her bed" (183).
Ziolkowski clearly allows his subjects to hang about batlike for awhile, and, as their upper bodies become engorged with fluid, he captures the stunned vertigo--the moment when resistance shifts to surrender, when identity melts away and is replaced by something very peaceful but exceedingly vulnerable.