bath salts


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bath salts

(băth, bäth)
pl.n.
1. A crystalline, often scented substance that is added to bathwater to improve lathering and soften the skin.
2. Any of several drugs composed of synthetic cathinones, used as stimulants and usually packaged as cosmetics or household products.

bath salts

1. Any of several water-soluble inorganic crystalline compounds, such as Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate), baking soda (sodium bicarbonate), or table salt (sodium chloride), usually colored and scented, and designed to be added to a bath. The salts soften the bathwater and purportedly improve cleaning and enhance the bathing experience.
2. Methylenedioxypyrovalerone.
See also: salt
References in periodicals archive ?
Steve Kerr, the chief development officer of the facility, confirmed to International Business Times that a homeless person likely smuggled in the bath salts Tuesday through the shelter's airport-style security.
Don't get too wrapped up in exact measurements with your bath salts.
He discussed three types of these designer drugs: synthetic cannabinoids, bath salts, and krokodil.
Bath salts can be administered by snorting, ingesting, smoking, or injecting.
19 Dead Sea Spa Magik Bath Salts Sea salt and mineral extracts make this perfect for soothing dry skin.
Bath salts are often snorted, but can also be taken as pills, he says.
According to University of Liverpool researchers, cadmium chloride, which is a highly toxic soluble compound used in making solar panels, requires elaborate safety measures to protect workers during manufacture, but it can be replaced it with magnesium chloride, which is extracted from seawater and is already used in products such as tofu, bath salts and for de-icing roads.
It is used to make tofu and is found in bath salts.
5) Approaches to care for the two conditions are divergent, however, with traditional management of bath salt induced agitation having the potential to worsen the symptoms of anticholinergic delirium.
In April of this year, the DEA put one of the main chemicals in bath salts in the Schedule I category, the most restrictive category created by the Controlled Substance Act.
But Conor's luck finally ran out when he overdosed his poached pear dish with lavender and felt the wrath of Dylan McGrath - who told him his dish tasted like bath salts.