fermentation

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fermentation

 [fer″men-ta´shun]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'men-tā'shŭn),
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, the anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

(fûr′mən-tā′shən, -mĕn-)
n.
Any of a group of chemical reactions induced by microorganisms or enzymes that split complex organic compounds into relatively simple substances, especially the anaerobic conversion of sugar to carbon dioxide and alcohol by yeast.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. bacteriology The anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

  1. See ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION.
  2. any industrial process involving the large-scale culturing of cells in either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, using fermenters.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by enzyme action, whereby a substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with production of energy and reduced compounds.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]
References in periodicals archive ?
Batch fermentations were carried out in stainless steel 20 L vats containing sugar cane (cultivar SP 801816) juice at 15oBrix (soluble solids content).
Immobilized Cell Bead Morphology Observation after Each Batch Fermentation. To evaluate the immobilized cell beads viability, scanning electron microscope (SEM, HITACHI S-3400N, Japan) was employed to observe the morphology changes of immobilized cell beads after five batch fermentation rounds.
The pure culture studies were extended to observe the effect of GP in simulated colonic fermentation using a batch fermentation model inoculated with faecal bacteria.
6 (a), is chosen to simulate close to realistic operating conditions at batch fermentations. Adaptation of P controller gain and the transfer coefficient between the set-point and the corrective term to time-varying operating conditions is demonstrated in Fig.
mobilis posseses pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase as reported by Gunasekran and Chandra [8] as the key enzymes in ethanol production and they tends to facilitate continuation of fermentation at high concentration of ethanol, they also stated that comparative laboratory- and pilot-scale studies on kinetics of batch fermentation of Z.
Batch fermentation was scaled-up with a 3-l fermentor (Applikon) with a vessel internal diameter of 0.13 m.
All kinetic parameters for batch fermentation was calculated as described previously [10].
Production of lipase by repeated batch fermentation with immobilized Rhizopus arrhizus.
Batch Fermentation: Modeling, Monitoring, and Control, Marcel Dekker, Inc., ISBN: 0-8247-4034-3, New York
The operating regions within a batch fermentation process are typically defined using a number of criteria including process knowledge, reaction kinetics, and batch control schemes.