fermentation

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fermentation

 [fer″men-ta´shun]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'men-tā'shŭn),
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, the anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

/fer·men·ta·tion/ (fer″men-ta´shun) the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fermentation

(fûr′mən-tā′shən, -mĕn-)
n.
Any of a group of chemical reactions induced by microorganisms or enzymes that split complex organic compounds into relatively simple substances, especially the anaerobic conversion of sugar to carbon dioxide and alcohol by yeast.

fermentation

[fur′məntā′shən]
Etymology: L, fermentare, to cause to rise
a chemical change that is brought about in a substance by the action of an enzyme or microorganism, especially the anaerobic conversion of foodstuffs to certain products. Kinds of fermentation are acetic fermentation, alcoholic fermentation, ammoniacal fermentation, amylic fermentation, butyric fermentation, caseous fermentation, dextran fermentation, diastatic fermentation, lactic acid fermentation, propionic fermentation, storing fermentation, and viscous fermentation.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. bacteriology The anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

  1. See ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION.
  2. any industrial process involving the large-scale culturing of cells in either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, using fermenters.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by enzyme action, whereby a substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with production of energy and reduced compounds.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation,

n a chemical change that is brought about in a substance by the action of an enzyme or microorganism, especially the anaerobic conversion of foodstuffs to certain products such as acetic fermentation, alcoholic fermentation.

fermentation

the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP. An essential part of the digestion that goes on in the rumen and in the colon and cecum of horses. Used commercially in the preparation of alcoholic beverages and the generation of by-products used as animal feed. Also the basic process in the manufacture of antibiotics.

batch fermentation
one of the methods used in the industrial production of microorganisms, where the sterile growth medium is inoculated with the microorganisms and no additional growth medium is added.
References in periodicals archive ?
USBA-018, using it together with yeast extract in a proportion of three parts AHE and one part YE produces twice the final concentration of lactic acid with better batch fermentation productivity after 48 hours of the fermentation process.
However, due to the complexity of the behaviour within an industrial batch fermentation compared with the simplicity of the batch simulation, the number of lags for individual operating regions was determined individually leading to a different number of lags for each region.
Results obtained for the sequential batch fermentations during 12 days of support recycling were also evaluated by analysis of variance and Tukey's test, with Minitab 14.
Batch fermentation was performed at 4 different temperatures (28[degrees]C, 32[degrees]C, 36[degrees]C and 40[degrees]C) to determine the effect of temperature on xylitol production.
2005a), it was reported that production of some bacteriocins can be increased by employing fed-batch rather than batch fermentation [16,36] (Guerra et al.
Table II: Comparison of performance and kinetic parameter values of xylanase production in batch fermentation of E.
For each technique, the VDI batch fermentation method was used to ferment pig manure, cow manure, cellulose and inoculum samples in triplicate.
Modak [12] used this principle for feed profile optimization for fed batch fermentation.
Also, biomass yields during the batch fermentation of lactic acid bacteria are being optimized.
The experiment was conducted separately for each condition as batch fermentation in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks.
Based on process development data at a 50 liter batch fermentation scale, Q Ceramic HyperD(R) LS had four times higher capacity than its nearest competitor in fluidized bed capture; additionally, the speed of the process was two times higher.