bat

(redirected from bat rabies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

bat

(bat),
A member of the mammalian order Chiroptera.
[M.E. bakke]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bat

(băt)
n.
Any of various nocturnal flying mammals of the order Chiroptera, having membranous wings that extend from the forelimbs to the hind limbs or tail and anatomical adaptations for echolocation, by which they navigate and hunt prey.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bat

A family of small flying mammals, order Chiroptera.
 
Bat pathogens
Duvenhage virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, Kasokero virus, Mokola virus, Lyssavirus, rabies, salmonellosis, Yuli virus.

BAT

Abbreviation for:
behavioural avoidance test
Bivalirudin Angioplasty Trial
blood alcohol testing
blunt abdominal trauma
Breath Alcohol Technician
brown adipose tissue

Bivalirudin Angioplasty Trial  A trial comparing bivalirudin/Angiomax to heparin in patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) for unstable angina.
 
Primary endpoint
In-hospital death, acute MI, target lesion revascularisation.
 
Conclusion
Post-PTCA for unstable angina, ASA and bivalirudin/Angiomax has fewer cardiac and haemorrhagic in-hospital events than ASA and heparin; post-PCI infusion of antithrombotics was used in both study groups.

Logistics
Randomised, double-blinded; 4315 patients—2151 heparin + aspirin, 2161 bivalirudin + aspirin.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

BAT

Blunt abdominal trauma. See Blunt trauma.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

BAT

Abbreviation for breath alcohol technician.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

BAT

Abbrev for brown adipose tissue.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

bat

a flying mammal of the order CHIROPTERA, the only true flying vertebrate apart from the birds.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
A systematic review of human bat rabies virus variant cases: evaluating unprotected physical contact with claws and teeth in support of accurate risk assessments.
He was not immunised against bat rabies because there is no requirement, despite a warning this year that UK bats could be carrying the virus.
Current state of bat rabies surveillance in Europe.
The area around Flagstaff, Arizona (Coconino County), USA, was free of sustained rabies virus transmission until 2001, when a spillover of a bat rabies virus variant was followed by a suspected host shift, with increased transmission in striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) populations (5).
He said: "Bat rabies has been around in Europe for quite a while, but the number of cases where people have been exposed and where there has been a tragic outcome is exceptionally small.
Since 2000, approximately 96% of all domestically acquired human rabies infections in the United States have been associated with bat rabies virus variants.
We assessed the effect of bat rabies during the same period, when guidelines for PEP were changing (2).
Experts assure us this is a rare case and that there has not been a death from bat rabies for a century.
Infection with a silver-haired bat rabies virus variant was confirmed in a saliva sample and the nuchal biopsy tissue by using nucleic acid amplification and sequencing.
From 1977 through 2009, a total of 928 cases of bat rabies (EBLV-1 and EBLV-2) were detected in Europe, but only 10 of the 45 known indigenous bat species tested positive for lyssavirus; most were serotine bats (Eptesicus serotinus) associated with EBLV-1 (5,6).
Antemortem diagnostic testing confirmed the diagnosis of rabies, and samples collected at autopsy were positive for a vampire bat rabies virus variant.
Bat rabies surveillance in France, from 1989 through May 2005.