bastard

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bastard

adjective
(1) Born out of wedlock; illegitimate.
(2) Not genuine; adulterated; ersatz.

noun A popular term for an extremely unpleasant, rude and/or malicious person.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
By contrast, the Proctor/Choat trial was one of only eight Essex County bastardy and paternity trials to acquit the putative father.
But one might ask the author of 'Leonardo,' how is one to eliminate the dice throws of bastardy? Is not the concept of sublimation, like that of the drive, precisely the concept of bastardy?" A highly analytical and thoughtful compendium of meticulous reasoning, and a welcome addition to philosophy shelves and college libraries.
The author asserts that sexuality served as a key category in the formation, contestation, and regulation of gender, race, and class hierarchies and that contrary to popular understandings, Philadelphia at this time was not a city of "chaste Quakers." The mid-eighteenth-century city was a complex environment where inhabitants engaged in a variety of nonmarital and extramarital affairs, where women forged spaces in which they could exercise their autonomy, where sex commerce and bastardy proliferated largely unchecked, and where many such acts and behaviors transgressed lines of gender, race, and class.
Marked by bastardy in the closing fourteenth scene, a feeling of entrapment and helplessness determines his outlook, which breaks out into a collective blood bath.
Buckingham's litany of Edward's supposed infidelity and the resulting bastardy of his sons in the Tower finally convinces the Mayor and citizens to "entreat" Richard to assume the throne.
(53) For the problem of bastardy as presented in Greek tragedy see also E.
Indeed, Crawford writes, "monsters illuminate some of the complex social issues around women's experiences of vagrancy and bastardy in early modern England" (77); the birth of monsters could therefore condemn wandering women, recusant women, sectarian women, sexually transgressive women, or women who gathered outside the purview of men--all of whom receive extensive treatment in subsequent chapters.
(3) Even before Du Bois theorized the emasculation of black men as an attenuate of slavery (speaking as he did of the "red stain of bastardy") and the twin evils of segregation and poverty, Frederick Douglass had already discursively connected racial oppression and black emasculation.
The contributors discuss topics such as survival strategies of unmarried mothers; social attitudes towards bastardy; the morality penalty of illegitimacy; the paternity of illegitimate children; and the existence of a bastardy prone sub-society.
MY CAREER as a misfit arguably began at birth, with my bastardy. My
And recently he was forced to withdraw a question about single-parent families after referring to 'state-subsidised bastardy as an attractive career option'.
These bastardy cases involving seafarer fathers were no different from the many similar ones in, say, Bristol, London or any other British port, rather than reflecting on the male convict population as rotten partners and irresponsible fathers.