basophilic

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basophilic

 [ba″so-fil´ik]
1. staining readily with basic dyes.
2. pertaining to basophils.
3. pertaining to or characterized by basophilia.

ba·so·phil·ic

(bā'sō-fil'ik),
Denoting tissue components having an affinity for basic dyes.
Synonym(s): basophil (2) , basophile

basophilic

/ba·so·phil·ic/ (-fil´ik)
1. pertaining to basophils.
2. staining readily with basic dyes.

basophilic

(bā′sə-fĭl′ĭk, -zə-) also

basophilous

(bə-sŏf′ə-ləs)
adj.
Relating to tissue components that stain readily with basic dyes.

basophilic

adjective Referring to basophilia.

ba·so·phil·ic

(bā'sō-fil'ik)
Denoting tissue components having an affinity for basic dyes.
Synonym(s): basophil (2) , basophile.

basophilic

Staining readily with basic dyes.

basophilic

staining readily with basic dyes.

basophilic bone matrix
vitamin D poisoning causes the appearance of intensely basophilic bone matrix of a distincitive pattern.
basophilic cell
see basophil cell.
basophilic enterocolitis
one of the several types of enterocolitis causing chronic diarrhea in horses characterized by fibrinous and ulcerative typhlocolitis and basophilic infiltrates in the regional mucosa and submucosa.
basophilic leukemia
basophilic rubricyte
a stage in cellular maturation of erythrocytes, between the prorubricyte and polychromatophilic rubricyte. Characterized by a narrow rim of dark blue cytoplasm and condensed nuclear chromatin in a 'cartwheel' pattern.
basophilic stippling
distinct or diffuse, fine to coarse, dark granular pattern in erythrocytes, representing aggregated ribosomes and caused by ineffective heme formation. Seen in lead poisoning, mainly in dogs and a characteristic of active erythropoiesis in sheep and cattle.
References in periodicals archive ?
due to its higher proportion of basophilous than silicicolous species, taking also into account some data on soils (Ca: 38.
obtusatum, Fraxinus ornus, Cornus mas or Sesleria autumnalis both in the basiphilous and acidophilous beech woods (with high preference for the basophilous beech woods) would seem to justify the inclusion of these woodlands in a south-eastern European alliance such as Aremonio-Fagion.
The distribution of the clusters along axis 1 (Figure 3) appears to follow a soil gradient, from left to right, from basophilous to acidophilous vegetation types: two main groups of clusters are clearly separated: the Seslerion communities on the left and the Nardion communities on the right.