basophil

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basophil

 [ba´so-fil]
1. any structure, cell, or histologic element staining readily with basic dyes.
2. a granular leukocyte with an irregularly shaped, pale-staining nucleus that is partially constricted into two lobes, and with cytoplasm containing coarse bluish-black granules of variable size; about 1 per cent bring anticoagulants to inflamed tissues. Called also basophilic leukocyte.
3. one of the hormone-producing basophilic cells of the adenohypophysis; types include gonadotrophs and thyrotrophs. Called also beta cell.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ba·so·phil

, basophile (bā'sō-fil, -fīl),
1. A cell with granules that stain specifically with basic dyes.
2. Synonym(s): basophilic
3. A phagocytic leukocyte of the blood characterized by numerous basophilic granules containing heparin, histamine, and leukotrines; except for its segmented nucleus, it is morphologically and physiologically similar to the mast cell although they originate from different stem cells in the bone marrow.
[baso- + G. philēo, to love]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

basophil

(bā′sə-fĭl, -zə-) also

basophile

(-fīl′, -fĭl)
n.
A cell, especially a white blood cell, having granules that stain readily with basic dyes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

basophil

A type of granular leukocyte with large, distinctly basophilic/“blue” secondary granules containing heparin, histamine, platelet-activating factor (PAF) and other mediators of the immediate hypersensitivity response, which are released when IgE cross-links to the high-affinity Fc receptors on the cell surface.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

basophil

Basophilic granulocyte Hematology A type of granular WBC with large distinctly basophilic/“blue” 2º granules containing heparin, histamine, PAF and other mediators of the immediate hypersensitivity response, which are released when IgE cross-links to the high affinity Fc receptors on the cell surface
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ba·so·phil

, basophile (bā'sō-fil, -fīl)
1. A cell with granules that stain specifically with basic dyes.
2. Synonym(s): basophilic.
3. A phagocytic leukocyte of the blood characterized by basophilic granules containing heparin and histamine; except for its segmented nucleus, it is morphologically and physiologically similar to the mast cell, although the two cell types originate from different stem cells in the bone marrow.
[baso- + G. philēo, to love]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

basophil

Having an affinity for alkali. The term is used conveniently to refer to the group of blood white cells (leukocytes) whose internal granules take up an alkaline stain. The granules in basophils are mainly histamine and it is the release of this powerful chemical that causes most of the trouble in allergy. Basophils closely resemble tissue MAST CELLS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Basophil

White blood cell that increases in response to parasitic infections and allergic reactions.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ba·so·phil

, basophile (bā'sō-fil, -fīl)
A phagocytic leukocyte of the blood characterized by numerous basophilic granules containing heparin, histamine, and leukotrines.
[baso- + G. philēo, to love]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Dendritic cells (DCs), basophiles, and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are part of this mechanism.
The haematological profiling was performed using the following 10 generic blood markers: White Blood Cells-WBC, Lymphocyte count-Lymph, Mid Sized Cell %-Mid (Basophiles, Eosinophils and Monocytes), Granulocytes-Gran, Red Blood Cells-Rbc, Haemoglobin Concentration-Hgb, Haematocrit-Hct, Mean Corpuscular (erythrocyte) Volume-MCV, Mean Cell (erythrocyte) Hemoglobin-MCH, and Mean Cell (erythrocyte) Hemoglobin Concentration-MCHC.
In group A, insignificant difference observed in the percentage values of neutrophils, monocytes and basophiles while significant differences were in percentage values of lymphocytes (P<0.003) and eosinophils (P<0.006).
observed in the percentage values of all five types of leukocytes i.e., neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils and basophiles. The results of present study are also in line with Osman and Al-Gaabary (2007) who reported variation in the different types of leukocytes in healthy and diseased animals.
In the second stage, beginning 48 hours after the injury, the adrenals are greatly enlarged but regain their lipoid granules, while the medullary chromaffin cells show vacuolization; the edema begins to disappear, numerous basophiles appear in the pituitary; the thyroid shows a tendency towards hyperplasia (more marked in the guinea pig); general body growth ceases, and the gonads become atrophic; in lactating animals, milk secretion stops.
It was found in the present study six types of leukocytes in the turtle blood, Phrynops hillary specie, basophiles, eosinophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and thrombocytes.
Biologically, the median of white blood cell count was 314.2 x [10.sup.9]/L, that of platelet count 340 x [10.sup.9]/L; those of polynuclear basophiles, blasts, and promyelocytes were respectively, 5%, 7%, and 8%.
Red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin content (Hb), haematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), white blood cell count (WBC), and the percentage of basophiles, eosinophils, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes were determined using standard techniques.