basket


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basket

 [bas·ket]
a container made of material woven together, or something resembling such a container.
Dormia basket a tiny apparatus consisting of four wires that can be advanced through an endoscope into a body cavity or tube, manipulated to trap a calculus or other object, and withdrawn.

bas·ket

(bas'ket),
1. A basketlike arborization of the axon of cells in the cerebellar cortex, surrounding the cell body of Purkinje cells.
2. Any basketlike device or structure.
[M.E., from Celtic]

bas·ket

(bas'kĕt)
1. A basketlike arborization of the axon of cells in the cerebellar cortex, surrounding the cell body of Purkinje cells.
2. Any basketlike structure.
[M.E., from Celtic]
References in classic literature ?
He took a tremendous jump off the top of the wall on to the top of the cat, and cuffed it off the basket, and kicked it into the garden-house, scratching off a handful of fur.
Tottering with weakness, she came forward, and delivered her basket. It was of full weight, as Legree well perceived; but, affecting anger, he said,
Again I thought of abandoning that basket, but did not.
She got up as she was speaking, and put her hands to her bonnet to adjust it, and then laid hold of her basket.
Athos then made him a sign to take up his basket and to walk on first.
There we sat and stripped the faded leaves and stems from our spoil, making up the blossoms into bouquets to fill our baskets with sweetness.
"Perhaps," continued Elinor, "if I should happen to cut out, I may be of some use to Miss Lucy Steele, in rolling her papers for her; and there is so much still to be done to the basket, that it must be impossible I think for her labour singly, to finish it this evening.
To divert my mind, I took up the newspaper which had covered the little basket of refreshments, and which now lay at the bottom of the coach, blushing with a deep-red stain and emitting a potent spirituous fume from the contents of the broken bottle of Kalydor.
After some search the woman drew from her basket an old pepper-box, upon the faded label of which the wizard had written with a lead-pencil:
Gentle Cecilia, sitting on the floor surrounded by good things, left it to the ingenuity of others to decide whether the baskets should be all emptied at once, or handed round
This done, she swept up such fragments of the torn paper in the basket as had fallen on the floor; threw them back again into the basket, along with the gum-bottle; fetched the bucket, and emptied the basket into it; and then proceeded to the fourth and last room in the corridor, where she finished her work for that day.
The baby in the cradle woke up and cried; the boy in the clothes-basket fell over on his back with the basket upon him, and was seen no more; the mother wept louder yet and rocked faster; but Kit, insensible to all the din and tumult, remained in a state of utter stupefaction.