basilicon


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Related to basilicon: basilican, Basilikon Doron

basilicon

An ointment composed of wax, pitch, resin, olive oil, lard or other fatty substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
'remember also that marriage is one of the greatest actions that a man does in all his lifetime, especially taking his first wife; and if he first marries low beneath his rank, he will always be held in less esteem after that.' SC2, Education, James VI, Basilicon Doron, 1598, <P 129>
(204.) KING JAMES I, Basilicon Doron, supra note 119, at 20.
King James I, Elizabeth's successor, described the nature of royalty in his Basilicon Doron, a royal treatise on kingship dedicated to his son.
(22) King James VI (James Craigie, ed.), Basilicon Doron, 2 volumes
(18.) The Basilicon Doran of King James VI, Scottish Text Society, ed.
Fe fyddi dipyn o brynu ar eli Basilicon, neu'r Colophony ointment ei enw arall, at dynnu casgl neu benddyn.
(24) Mark Fortier has recently shown how strongly King James in his True Law of Free Monarchies (1598) and Basilicon Doron (1599) praised legal equity and advocated it in his struggles with common-law proponent Sir Edward Coke, most notably in The Earl of Oxford's Case (1616).
The Daemonologie is present as are Basilicon Doron, The Trew Law of Free Monarchies, A Counterblaste to Tobacco, and A Meditation Upon the 27.
The strength of Shuger's analysis becomes evident when she looks at Measure for Measure's duke, an example of a "sacred monarch" whose type is illustrated in such texts as Desiderius Erasmus' Education of a Christian Prince, Martin Bucer's De regno Christi, and James I's Basilicon Doron.
Shandy's `Lint and Basilicon': The Importance of Women in Tristram Shandy" South Atlantic Review 46 (1981): 61-75.
By focusing on conscience in William Perkins's Discourse of Conscience, James VI and I's Basilicon Doron, and Shakespeare's history plays, particularly Henry V, I hope to illuminate tensions between individual judgment and obligations to authority within the concept of conscience that give us more precise understanding of religious and national identity in early modern England.