cranial base

(redirected from basicranium)

cra·ni·al base

[TA]
the sloping floor of the cranial cavity. It comprises both the external base of cranium (external view) and the internal base of cranium (internal view).
Synonym(s): basis cranii [TA], basicranium ☆ , base of cranium
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

cra·ni·al base

(krānē-ăl bās) [TA]
Sloping floor of cranial cavity; comprises both external base of cranium and internal base of cranium.
Synonym(s): base of cranium, basicranium.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Among various factors effecting skeletal malocclusions are morphology of basicranium, head neck posture, soft tissue stretching and breathing pattern.
The pterygoids cover ventrally the basicranium. Here, the evidence of a short suture in the posterior border, lateral to the midline suggests the pterygoids slightly separate posteriorly, exposing a small portion of the basioccipital (Figure 3B).
The corresponding lack of a cranial base might also be explained by intentional modification/removal of parts of the basicranium in order to mount the cranium for display purposes.
This taxon is diagnosed by autopomorphic features observed in the basicranium, vertebrae, and appendicular bones.
The skull is broken in half, most of the basicranium and right side of the braincase are missing, the left tympanic bulla is loose and both zygomatic arches are broken.
A subsequent visit in 2008 yielded the basicranium, an important structure for determining taxonomic relationships.
The sellar region is a relatively small area of valuable "real estate" in the basicranium. This region contains critical neurovascular structures that directly cause disease processes or that are involved in the pathology as a result of the compact surroundings.
This discipline allows us to study the position of the mandible and maxilla in relation to the position of the basicranium and adjacent structures.
The cranium, which lacks only the nasals and basicranium, is compressed dorsoventrally and slightly toward the right.
Frayer studied the degree of bend in the base, or basicranium, of Neadertal and modern human skulls.
In comparative studies of mammals ranging from dolphins to apes, using dissections and X-ray movies, they find that a relatively straight, unflexed basicranium indicates a larynx positioned high in the neck.