basicervical fracture

basicervical fracture

A fracture of the femoral neck at the junction with the trochanteric line.
References in periodicals archive ?
Basicervical fracture is a fracture through the base of femoral neck at its junction with the intertrochanteric region.
Inclusion Criteria: Criteria for inclusion required mobility with no or one walking aid, presenting with basicervical fracture or its equivalent; a basicervical fracture, defined as an extracapsular fracture, through the base of the femoral neck at its junction with the intertrochanteric region [3], corresponding to the AO type B2.1 [18]; and simulators of the basicervical fracture, defined as a trochanteric fracture in which the head-neck fragment does not remain connected to the trochanters and its inferior cortical extension is not long enough to hinder its rotational movement.
Because basicervical fracture occurs at an area of differentiation of the femoral neck to the trochanteric region, it lacks an exact definition and appropriate place within the most commonly used classification systems.
[22] In brief, the common denominator of basicervical fracture and its simulators is an axial and rotary instability.
In other words, pure 1 type is the so-called neck fracture, pure 2 type is the so-called basicervical fracture, pure 3 type is the so-called trochanteric fracture, and pure 4 type is the so-called subtrochanteric fracture (Figure 2).
In "area classification," pure 1 type is a neck fracture, pure 2 type is a basicervical fracture, pure 3 type is a trochanteric fracture, and pure 4 type is a subtrochanteric fracture.
In addition, proximal femoral fractures broken near the border between the neck and the trochanteric part are said to be basicervical fractures (basal neck fractures) [12].
Of the four femoral neck fractures that occurred, two occurred within 2 months, the third was a basicervical fracture that occurred at 24 months postoperatively after a fall, and the fourth occurred 41 months postoperatively after trauma.
* Basicervical fractures, when the fracture line is located at neck's junction to the greater trochanter (Sbenghe, 1981).
(59.) Blair B, Koval KJ, Kummer F, et al: Basicervical fractures of the proximal femur: A biomechanical study of three internal fixation techniques.