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base

 [bās]
1. the lowest part or foundation of anything. See also basis.
2. the main ingredient of a compound.
3. the nonacid part of a salt; a substance that combines with acids to form salts. In the chemical processes of the body, bases are essential to the maintenance of a normal acid-base balance. Excessive concentration of bases in the body fluids leads to alkalosis.
4. a unit of a removable dental prosthesis.
5. in genetics, a nucleotide, particularly one in a nucleic acid sequence.
intermediary base the layer of cement between a dental restoration and the tooth structure, acting as an insulator and protective barrier.
nitrogenous base an aromatic, nitrogen-containing molecule that serves as a proton acceptor, e.g., purine or pyrimidine.
ointment base a vehicle for the medicinal substances carried in an ointment.
purine b's a group of compounds of which purine is the base, including uric acid, adenine, xanthine, and theobromine.
Bases. A, Purine and some substituted purine bases occurring in nucleic acids. B, Pyrimidine and some substituted pyrimidine bases occurring in nucleic acids. From Dorland's, 2000.
pyrimidine b's a group of chemical compounds of which pyrimidine is the base, including uracil, thymine, and cytosine, which are common constituents of nucleic acids.

base

(bās), [TA]
1. The lower part or bottom; the part of a pyramidal or conic structure opposite the apex (for example, heart); the foundation.
See also: Brønsted base, Lewis base. Synonym(s): basis [TA], basement (1)
2. pharmacy the chief ingredient of a mixture.
See also: Brønsted base, Lewis base.
3. chemistry an electropositive element (cation) that unites with an anion to form a salt; a compound ionizing to yield hydroxyl ion.
See also: Brønsted base, Lewis base. Synonym(s): alkali (2)
4. Nitrogen-containing organic compounds (for example, purines, pyrimidines, amines, alkaloids, and ptomaines) that act as Brønsted bases.
5. Cations, or substances forming cations.
6. A substance the pH of which is over 7.0, in contrast to an acid.
[L. and G. basis]

base

(bās)
n.
1. Biology
a. The part of a plant or animal organ that is nearest to its point of attachment.
b. The point of attachment of such an organ.
2. Chemistry
a. Any of a class of compounds whose aqueous solutions are characterized by a bitter taste, a slippery feel, the ability to turn litmus blue, and the ability to react with acids to form salts.
b. A substance that yields hydroxide ions when dissolved in water.
c. A substance that can act as a proton acceptor.
d. A substance that can donate a pair of electrons to form a covalent bond.
3. One of the nitrogen-containing purines (adenine and guanine) or pyrimidines (cytosine, thymine, and uracil) that occurs attached to the sugar component of DNA or RNA.

base

The core of thing.
 
Anatomy
The bottom of a conical or pyramidal structure—basis TA, basement.
 
Chemistry
(1) An electropositive substance which combines with an acid to form a salt.
(2) A substance that dissociates to give H+ ions in aqueous solutions; chemical substance that ionises in water to release hydroxyl ions (OH-) or other ions that combine with hydrogen ions.
(3) A substance which can combine with a protons/H+ ions.
(4) Cation.
 
Drug slang
A regional street term for freebase cocaine; crack.
 
Molecular biology
A single nucleotide.

Pharmacology
The core active ingredient of a therapeutic agent.
 
Vox populi
The lowest part, bottom or fundamental part of structure.

base

(bās) [TA]
1. The lower part or bottom; the part of a pyramidal or conic structure opposite the apex; the foundation.
Synonym(s): basis [TA] .
2. pharmacy The chief ingredient of a mixture.
3. chemistry An electropositive element (cation) that unites with an anion to form a salt; a compound ionizing to yield hydroxyl ion.
Synonym(s): alkali (2) .
4. Nitrogen-containing organic compounds (e.g., purines, pyrimidines, amines, alkaloids, ptomaines) that act as Br̷ønsted bases.
5. A substance with a pH over 7.0, in contrast to an acid.
See also: Br̷ønsted base, Lewis base
[L. and G. basis]

base

A chemical compound that combines with an acid to form a salt and water. A term applied in genetics to one of the four nitrogenous bases of DNA and RNA. In DNA the bases are adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine. Guanine and adenine are purines and cytosine and thymine are pyrimidines. In RNA, the pyrimidine base uracil replaces thymine. (See also BASE PAIR).

base

  1. a chemical substance which has a tendency to accept protons (H+); the base dissolves in water with the production of hydroxyl ions and reacts with acids to form salts.
  2. one of the PURINE or PYRIMIDINE components of NUCLEOTIDES.

base

(bās) [TA]
1. The lower part or bottom; the part of a pyramidal or conic structure opposite the apex (e.g., heart); the foundation.
Synonym(s): basement (1) .
2. pharmacy the chief ingredient of a mixture.
3. A substance with a pH over 7.0, in contrast to an acid.
[L. and G. basis]

Patient discussion about base

Q. i am diabetic :( what is the right diet for me? should i avoid sugar based products? what is the amount of sugar in the blood that consider to be normal ?

A. You may find it all here:

www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabeticdiet.html

Q. where is the greatest data base of Fibromyalgia over the net? do someone know the address ? will i find all my answers there ? is it like here where you can chat with other patient ?

A. i looked for information about Fibromyalgia all around the web and the best site gathering reliable information on it is:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/fibromyalgia.html

gives you every web page about it and with a quality stamp :)


Q. Is good Nutrition is the base of a good and healthy life?

A. good nutrition will not solve all your health problems in life, you can still have infections and other health problems but it will reduce the amount of it in dramatic way.

More discussions about base
References in periodicals archive ?
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Yet the signs of Purviance's obsession with seducing women solely to humiliate and then drag them to the basest levels of behavior were already apparent to the narrator, who had observed how his idol's treatment of a mistress had driven her to alcoholism, drugs, and, eventually, death.
The radical coalition partners of fundamentalist religious parties are speaking to the public's basest instincts, and threatening to murder the proponents of a different opinion, literally.
The focus on the physical appearance of Katherine Harris, Florida's secretary of state, was despicable, a perfect example of television's ability to pander to our basest level.
While we understand that the Second Amendment is the guarantee of Freedom in our society, Hollywood and the media have catered to people's basest nature to make a profit off gun violence thereby distorting the importance of our right to self-defense.
In the introduction, Machan, an essayist, university professor and adviser for Freedom Communications-the parent company of this publication-maps out the book's course by negating an affirmation by French writer Charles Baudelaire, "Commerce is satanic, because it is the basest and vilest form of egoism." Machan asserts that there is nothing morally questionable about commercial activity.
Instead, they pander to the basest, most vengeful impulses of the public.
Appealing to the basest of instincts has always played well on the web, and the primal longing for cash rewards is the driving force beyond iWon.com, which has just launched with a flurry of publicity, centered mainly around the huge amount of cash the company itself acquired from CBS Inc.