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base

 [bās]
1. the lowest part or foundation of anything. See also basis.
2. the main ingredient of a compound.
3. the nonacid part of a salt; a substance that combines with acids to form salts. In the chemical processes of the body, bases are essential to the maintenance of a normal acid-base balance. Excessive concentration of bases in the body fluids leads to alkalosis.
4. a unit of a removable dental prosthesis.
5. in genetics, a nucleotide, particularly one in a nucleic acid sequence.
intermediary base the layer of cement between a dental restoration and the tooth structure, acting as an insulator and protective barrier.
nitrogenous base an aromatic, nitrogen-containing molecule that serves as a proton acceptor, e.g., purine or pyrimidine.
ointment base a vehicle for the medicinal substances carried in an ointment.
purine b's a group of compounds of which purine is the base, including uric acid, adenine, xanthine, and theobromine.
Bases. A, Purine and some substituted purine bases occurring in nucleic acids. B, Pyrimidine and some substituted pyrimidine bases occurring in nucleic acids. From Dorland's, 2000.
pyrimidine b's a group of chemical compounds of which pyrimidine is the base, including uracil, thymine, and cytosine, which are common constituents of nucleic acids.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

base

(bās), [TA]
1. The lower part or bottom; the part of a pyramidal or conic structure opposite the apex (for example, heart); the foundation.
See also: Brønsted base, Lewis base. Synonym(s): basis [TA], basement (1)
2. pharmacy the chief ingredient of a mixture.
See also: Brønsted base, Lewis base.
3. chemistry an electropositive element (cation) that unites with an anion to form a salt; a compound ionizing to yield hydroxyl ion.
See also: Brønsted base, Lewis base. Synonym(s): alkali (2)
4. Nitrogen-containing organic compounds (for example, purines, pyrimidines, amines, alkaloids, and ptomaines) that act as Brønsted bases.
5. Cations, or substances forming cations.
6. A substance the pH of which is over 7.0, in contrast to an acid.
[L. and G. basis]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

base

(bās)
n.
1. Biology
a. The part of a plant or animal organ that is nearest to its point of attachment.
b. The point of attachment of such an organ.
2. Chemistry
a. Any of a class of compounds whose aqueous solutions are characterized by a bitter taste, a slippery feel, the ability to turn litmus blue, and the ability to react with acids to form salts.
b. A substance that yields hydroxide ions when dissolved in water.
c. A substance that can act as a proton acceptor.
d. A substance that can donate a pair of electrons to form a covalent bond.
3. One of the nitrogen-containing purines (adenine and guanine) or pyrimidines (cytosine, thymine, and uracil) that occurs attached to the sugar component of DNA or RNA.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

base

The core of thing.
 
Anatomy
The bottom of a conical or pyramidal structure—basis TA, basement.
 
Chemistry
(1) An electropositive substance which combines with an acid to form a salt.
(2) A substance that dissociates to give H+ ions in aqueous solutions; chemical substance that ionises in water to release hydroxyl ions (OH-) or other ions that combine with hydrogen ions.
(3) A substance which can combine with a protons/H+ ions.
(4) Cation.
 
Drug slang
A regional street term for freebase cocaine; crack.
 
Molecular biology
A single nucleotide.

Pharmacology
The core active ingredient of a therapeutic agent.
 
Vox populi
The lowest part, bottom or fundamental part of structure.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

base

(bās) [TA]
1. The lower part or bottom; the part of a pyramidal or conic structure opposite the apex; the foundation.
Synonym(s): basis [TA] .
2. pharmacy The chief ingredient of a mixture.
3. chemistry An electropositive element (cation) that unites with an anion to form a salt; a compound ionizing to yield hydroxyl ion.
Synonym(s): alkali (2) .
4. Nitrogen-containing organic compounds (e.g., purines, pyrimidines, amines, alkaloids, ptomaines) that act as Br̷ønsted bases.
5. A substance with a pH over 7.0, in contrast to an acid.
See also: Br̷ønsted base, Lewis base
[L. and G. basis]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

base

A chemical compound that combines with an acid to form a salt and water. A term applied in genetics to one of the four nitrogenous bases of DNA and RNA. In DNA the bases are adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine. Guanine and adenine are purines and cytosine and thymine are pyrimidines. In RNA, the pyrimidine base uracil replaces thymine. (See also BASE PAIR).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

base

  1. a chemical substance which has a tendency to accept protons (H+); the base dissolves in water with the production of hydroxyl ions and reacts with acids to form salts.
  2. one of the PURINE or PYRIMIDINE components of NUCLEOTIDES.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

base

(bās) [TA]
1. The lower part or bottom; the part of a pyramidal or conic structure opposite the apex (e.g., heart); the foundation.
Synonym(s): basement (1) .
2. pharmacy the chief ingredient of a mixture.
3. A substance with a pH over 7.0, in contrast to an acid.
[L. and G. basis]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about base

Q. i am diabetic :( what is the right diet for me? should i avoid sugar based products? what is the amount of sugar in the blood that consider to be normal ?

A. You may find it all here:

www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabeticdiet.html

Q. where is the greatest data base of Fibromyalgia over the net? do someone know the address ? will i find all my answers there ? is it like here where you can chat with other patient ?

A. i looked for information about Fibromyalgia all around the web and the best site gathering reliable information on it is:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/fibromyalgia.html

gives you every web page about it and with a quality stamp :)


Q. Is good Nutrition is the base of a good and healthy life?

A. good nutrition will not solve all your health problems in life, you can still have infections and other health problems but it will reduce the amount of it in dramatic way.

More discussions about base
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References in periodicals archive ?
There be some sports are painful, and their labour Delight in them set off; some kinds of baseness Are nobly undergone; and most poor matters Point to rich ends.
Others, however, have interpreted West's video as a twisted fairytale that skewers the cult of celebrity and the baseness of those attracted to fame.
Amelia got down the stairs first and pronto started bellowing obscenities about the baseness of dogs.
Still, there was a pathos about a country which, established by the American Colonisation Society (ACS) in 1827 as a colony for freed blacks, could come to regard the indigenous Africans as a people fit only for subservience, in the process degrading itself so completely that a bunch of European powers, former slave traders through and through, could lecture convincingly about the baseness of the Liberian enterprise.
The state official described the allegations as "baseness" and "misleading" to the public of Northern Bahr-El-Ghazal state and the world readers at large.
But Berne, accused by Libya of "political baseness," has not confirmed that such a list exists, saying that it is pursuing a "restrictive visa policy" for Libyans put in place in September 2009, given that Tripoli is still detaining two Swiss citizens.
But my faith in the baseness of humanity was restored in a brief journey from the city centre one recent evening rush-hour.
We'd grow despondent and indifferent, resigned to our baseness. Instead, we have a crucial capacity for forgetting that allows us to judge ourselves with mercy and compassion, to think of ourselves as generally decent people.
In Ivo van Hove's reimagined Misanthrope at NYTW in 2007, Camp plunged his Alceste to new levels of shock and baseness, smearing himself with chocolate sauce and rolling around in trash brought in from the actual East Village street.
Relationships based on worldly values can degenerate into baseness, as often happens in marriage.
Of all these known instances of white renegades, none equals the cruelty and absolute baseness of Simon Girty."