baseless

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baseless

adjective Having no foundation or support; unfounded; speculative.
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References in periodicals archive ?
That alone proves the invalidity of these rumors, as well as the realization of their baselessness and lack of evidence by the initiators." Husain noted, "The Company affirms that it will not disregard these false accusations.
His meditation on revenge leads to thoughts of revenge on mayonnaise, a condiment that he despises, to "seeking revenge on fiction by writing fiction," which leads him to realize that he writes fiction "to seek revenge on nothingness, meaninglessness, and the baselessness of existence." The scene's humor and imaginative play with language are finally overwhelmed by sincerity.
Moreover, the objective prong--the objective baselessness of litigation counsel's theories of invalidity or noninfringement--must be determined first.
If all of this seems utterly baseless, dizzyingly circular, and unabashedly irrational, theologian John Calvin assures us that such baselessness, circularity, and irrationality are indeed at the heart of the matter.
This indicates baselessness of the idea that children of infidel people will be in the Hell with their parents [12].
And as for Rouhani's "rapprochement with the international community", nowhere else is the baselessness of this claim by his government more starkly illustrated than in the continued military and financial support Khamenei and his stooges in the Revolutionary Guard are throwing behind the murderous regime of Bashar Assad in Syria, despite increasing international calls for his removal from power.
(150) "Not merely can [the plaintiff] recover the estimated sum of his past and future losses, but in case the libel, driven underground, emerges from its lurking place at some future date, he must be able to point to a sum awarded by a jury sufficient to convince a bystander of the baselessness of the charge": Cassel & Co v Broome, [1972] AC 1027 HL (Eng) at 1071 [Cassel], cited in Brown, supra note 7 at 205, n 6.
Despite the baselessness of the claim, many Americans are likely buying into the notion of an apology tour.
In describing the so-called "Chekhovian perspective," Vladimir Kataev writes: "The relative, conditional nature of ideas and opinions, and of stereotyped ways of thinking and behaving; the refusal to regard an individual solution as absolute; and the baselessness of various claims to possession of 'real truth': these are constants in Chekhov's world." (37) In Woe from Wit as in Chekhov's plays later, no single character--not even Chatsky--is the owner of the complete and sole truth.