base of skull

(redirected from Base of the skull)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

base of skull

(bās skŭl)
The sloping floor of the cranial cavity. It comprises both the external base of skull (external view) and the internal base of skull (internal view).
Synonym(s): basis cranii [TA] .
References in classic literature ?
The artist never turned his head; and in all his soul's application to the task his back quivered, his thin neck, sunk into a deep hollow at the base of the skull, seemed ready to snap.
The Ryder Cup star had a Chiari malformation - where the lower part of the brain pushes down into the spinal canal - and had a titanium plate inserted at the base of the skull.
The doctor explained that the giant malformation was five times larger than the pituitary gland, located at the base of the skull, and also called the 'mother gland', because it controls many of the activities of other glands that allow the proper functioning of the organism.
The injured man had a fracture to the base of the skull that stretched to the eye socket leaving him with blurred vision that made reading difficult, the court heard.
He explained that the patient's Temporal Mandibula Joint (TMJ) was "fused with the base of the skull" leading to what is known as total fibrous and bony ankylosis, which means the abnormal stiffening and immobility of a joint.
This disease affects the joint between the stylohyoid and the base of the skull as well as the stylohyoid itself.
It works best on some rare cancers, including tumours affecting the base of the skull or the spine.
Recording a conclusion of accidental death, Mr Jones said: "My belief is that the impact caused the head to go back and fracture the base of the skull. The bike carried on through the undergrowth and further injuries were caused."
Radiologists, head and neck surgeons, oncologists, and other medical specialists describe the use of imaging methods in the diagnosis of cancer at the base of the skull and in planning the treatment of it.
The team discovered bubbles of air in the tissues at the back of his throat and neck from the base of the skull to halfway down the man's back.
A five-year-old male began experiencing a popping sensation followed immediately by the sensation of heat and pressure starting medially at the base of the skull which radiated two centimeters bilaterally.
The research team calculated how blood flowing to the brain of human ancestors have changed over the time, using the size of two holes at the base of the skull at allow arteries to pass to the brain.