base excess


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base ex·cess

a measure of metabolic alkalosis, usually predicted from the Siggaard-Andersen nomogram; the amount of strong acid that would have to be added per unit volume of whole blood to titrate it to pH 7.4 while at 37°C and at a carbon dioxide pressure of 40 mmHg.

base excess

A measure of the nonrespiratory buffers—bicarbonate, haemoglobin, proteins—in blood.

BE refers to a deviation of the buffer base (BB) from normal BB, and is the amount of base in fully oxygenated blood (which is zero at pH 7.4, the normal base value of the blood); it is equal to the amount of a strong acid or base needed to bring the pH in blood to 7.4 at a pCO2 of 40 mmHg—5.3 kPa at 37ºC. The presence of base excess suggests metabolic alkalosis; a base deficit suggests metabolic acidosis. It is defined by the equation BE = actual BB – normal BB.

base ex·cess

(bās eks'es)
A measure of metabolic alkalosis; the amount of strong acid that would have to be added per unit volume of whole blood to titrate it to pH 7.4 while at 37°C and at a carbon dioxide pressure of 40 mmHg.
References in periodicals archive ?
Base excess or base deficit is an indication of the amount of anionic compound and hydrogen ion in the patient's blood compared to the "normal" level for that patient.
The 8-isoprostane concentration performed significantly better than chance (area under the curve, 0.74), roughly on a par with cord arterial pH and 5-min Apgar score, but it significantly underperformed compared with base excess (DeLong statistic, P <0.05).
The reference range for carbon dioxide partial pressure was set to 35 mmHg to 45 mmHg and for base excess (BE) -2 mEq/L to +2 mEq/L.
The primary outcome was a composite adverse neonatal outcome of umbilical cord pH less than 7.1, a base excess less than -10, a 5-minute Apgar score of less than 7, and neonatal ICU (NICU) admission.
Her condition deteriorated, with generalised peritonitis, a very high base excess (-12.5 mmol/l) on arterial blood gas measurement, and a serum amylase level of 341 U/l.
Apgar scores at 1-5 min, pH, Pvcoz, base excess, and respiratory distress syndrome incidence were significantly (P <0.001) different in asphyxiated newborns compared with controls regardless of the severity of HIE.
For each sample, the pH, carbon dioxide in the plasma bicarbonate, base excess, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, total carbon dioxide, partial pressure of oxygen and oxygen saturation were determined.