basal ganglia lesions

basal ganglia lesions

awkward, unintentional or involuntary movements and tremor due to the loss of production of dopamine, causing symptoms of hyperkinetic (e.g. Huntington's chorea, Sydenham's chorea or St Vitus' dance) and hypokinetic (e.g. Parkinson's disease) dyskinesias
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References in periodicals archive ?
5) Carbon monoxide intoxication is most known for causing basal ganglia lesions on neuroimaging and has been shown to cause other changes such as widespread atrophy and decreased hippocampal volume.
Difficulty consolidating and learning new explicit information is consistent with bilateral hippocampal loss, and difficulty learning procedural aspects of motor tasks is consistent with bilateral basal ganglia lesions.
Basal ganglia lesions following carbon monoxide poisoning.
The syndrome of acute bilateral basal ganglia lesions is an illness which has been rarely reported so far.
After two months, we were surprised to find that the abnormal signals of the lesions totally disappeared when we scanned her again, and this demonstrated that the acute bilateral basal ganglia lesions are reversible.
Acute movement disorders associated with isolated bilateral basal ganglia lesions have been recognized in patients with end-stage renal disease, particularly in the setting of diabetic nephropathy.
These features, observed also by Kim and his colleagues, indicate that some regions in the basal ganglia lesions are undergoing irreversible cytotoxic damage [7].
Our finding of the predilection for focal basal ganglia lesions and thalamic lesions in patients with EEEV is consistent with findings in prior studies (3,22-24).
Basal ganglia lesions in methanol poisoning: MR appearance.
Basal ganglia lesions, primarily in the putamen and caudate nucleus, correlate with the severity of depression and with susceptibility to side effects of neuroleptics.
The effect of basal ganglia lesions remains highly significant, after controlling for white matter severity and all non-MRI variables," Dr.
Maki et al described four patients with basal ganglia lesions following minor head trauma.

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