basal cell carcinoma

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Related to basal cell carcinomas: Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

carcinoma

 [kahr″sĭ-no´mah] (pl. carcinomas, carcino´mata)
a malignant new growth made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate surrounding tissues and to give rise to metastases. A form of cancer, carcinoma makes up the majority of the cases of malignancy of the breast, uterus, intestinal tract, skin, and tongue.
adenocystic carcinoma (adenoid cystic carcinoma) carcinoma marked by cylinders or bands of hyaline or mucinous stroma separated or surrounded by nests or cords of small epithelial cells, occurring in the mammary and salivary glands, and mucous glands of the respiratory tract. Called also cylindroma.
alveolar carcinoma bronchioloalveolar carcinoma.
basal cell carcinoma the most common form of skin cancer, consisting of an epithelial tumor of the skin originating from neoplastic differentiation of basal cells, rarely metastatic but locally invasive and aggressive. It usually occurs as small pearly nodules or plaques on the face of an older adult, particularly on a sun-exposed area of someone with fair skin. It has been divided into numerous subtypes on the basis of clinical and histological characteristics.
basosquamous carcinoma carcinoma that histologically exhibits both basal and squamous elements.
bronchioalveolar carcinoma (bronchiolar carcinoma) (bronchioloalveolar carcinoma) (bronchoalveolar carcinoma) a variant type of adenocarcinoma of the lung, with columnar to cuboidal epithelial cells lining the alveolar septa and projecting into alveolar spaces in branching papillary formations. Called also alveolar carcinoma or adenocarcinoma and bronchiolar, bronchioloalveolar, or bronchoalveolar adenocarcinoma.
bronchogenic carcinoma any of a large group of carcinomas of the lung, so called because they arise from the epithelium of the bronchial tree. Four primary subtypes are distinguished: adenocarcinoma of the lung, large cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.
cholangiocellular carcinoma a rare type of hepatocellular carcinoma arising from the cholangioles, consisting of two layers of cells surrounding a minute lumen. Called also bile duct carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma.
chorionic carcinoma choriocarcinoma.
colloid carcinoma mucinous carcinoma.
cylindrical cell carcinoma carcinoma in which the cells are cylindrical or nearly so.
embryonal carcinoma a highly malignant germ cell tumor that is a primitive form of carcinoma, probably of primitive embryonal cell derivation; it usually arises in a gonad and may be found either in pure form or as part of a mixed germ cell tumor.
epidermoid carcinoma squamous cell carcinoma.
giant cell carcinoma a poorly differentiated, highly malignant, epithelial neoplasm containing many large multinucleated tumor cells, such as occurs in the lungs.
hepatocellular carcinoma primary carcinoma of the liver cells with hepatomegaly, jaundice, hemoperitoneum, and other symptoms of the presence of an abdominal mass. It is rare in North America and Western Europe but is one of the most common malignancies in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, East Asia, and elsewhere. A strong association seems to exist with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.
Hürthle cell carcinoma a malignant Hürthle cell tumor.
carcinoma in si´tu a neoplasm whose tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane; the likelihood of subsequent invasive growth is presumed to be high.
large cell carcinoma a type of bronchogenic carcinoma of undifferentiated (anaplastic) cells of large size, a variety of squamous cell carcinoma that has undergone further dedifferentiation.
medullary carcinoma that composed mainly of epithelial elements with little or no stroma.
mucinous carcinoma an adenocarcinoma that produces significant amounts of mucin.
nasopharyngeal carcinoma a malignant tumor arising in the epithelial lining of the nasopharynx, occurring at high frequency in people of Chinese descent. The epstein-barr virus has been implicated as a causative agent.
non–small cell carcinoma a general term comprising all lung carcinomas except small cell carcinoma, and including adenocarcinoma of the lung, large cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.
oat cell carcinoma a form of small cell carcinoma in which the cells are round or elongated and slightly larger than lymphocytes; they have scanty cytoplasm and clump poorly.
papillary carcinoma carcinoma in which there are papillary growths that are irregular in nature arising from otherwise normal tissue; it can occur in the thyroid gland, the breast, or the bladder. Called also papillocarcinoma.
renal cell carcinoma carcinoma of the renal parenchyma, composed of tubular cells in varying arrangements; called also clear cell carcinoma.
scirrhous carcinoma carcinoma with a hard structure owing to the formation of dense connective tissue in the stroma. Called also fibrocarcinoma.
carcinoma sim´plex an undifferentiated carcinoma.
small cell carcinoma a common, highly malignant form of bronchogenic carcinoma in the wall of a major bronchus, occurring mainly in middle-aged individuals with a history of tobacco smoking; it is radiosensitive and has small oval undifferentiated cells. Metastasis to the hilum and to mediastinal lymph nodes is common.
spindle cell carcinoma squamous cell carcinoma marked by development of rapidly proliferating spindle cells.
squamous cell carcinoma
1. carcinoma developed from squamous epithelium, having cuboid cells and characterized by keratinization. Initially local and superficial, the lesion may later invade and metastasize.
2. the form occurring in the skin, usually originating in sun-damaged areas or preexisting lesions.
3. in the lung, one of the most common types of bronchogenic carcinoma, generally forming polypoid or sessile masses that obstruct the airways of the bronchi. It usually occurs in middle-aged individuals with a history of smoking. There is frequent invasion of blood and lymphatic vessels with metastasis to regional lymph nodes and other sites. Called also epidermoid carcinoma.
transitional cell carcinoma a malignant tumor arising from a transitional type of stratified epithelium, usually affecting the urinary bladder.
verrucous carcinoma
1. a variety of squamous cell carcinoma that has a predilection for the buccal mucosa but also affects other oral soft tissue and the larynx. It is slow-growing and somewhat invasive.
2. Buschke-Löwenstein tumor, so called because it is histologically similar to the oral lesion.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ba·sal cell car·ci·no·ma

a slow-growing, invasive, but usually nonmetastasizing neoplasm recapitulating normal basal cells of the epidermis or hair follicles, most commonly arising in sun-damaged skin of the elderly and fair-skinned.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

basal cell carcinoma

n.
A slow-growing, locally invasive, but rarely metastasizing neoplasm of the skin derived from basal cells of the epidermis or hair follicles.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

basal cell carcinoma

A usually indolent skin cancer that is most common in the sun-exposed regions of the head, neck and upper body in older individuals.
 
Management
Local excision; in areas where tissue border may compromise function or appearance (e.g., angle of eyes, eyelids, nose), Mohs surgery may be indicated.
 
Pathogenesis
Basal cell carcinomas appear to arise from two distinct cell types: interfollicular epidermal basal keratinocytes, which are hedgehog-driven tumours, and follicular epidermal basal keratinocytes, which arise from the so-called bulge stem.

Types
• Adenoid basal cell carcinoma.
• Basosquamous basal cell carcinoma.
• Cystic basal cell carcinoma.
• Fibroepithelial basal cell carcinoma.
• Infiltrating basal cell carcinoma.
• Infundibulo-cystic basal cell carcinoma.
• Keratotic basal cell carcinoma.
• Metatypical basal cell carcinoma.
• Micronodular basal cell carcinoma.
• Nodular (solid) basal cell carcinoma.
• Pigmented basal cell carcinoma.
• Sclerosing basal cell carcinoma.
• Superficial basal cell carcinoma.
• Adenomatoid basal cell carcinoma.
• Clear cell basal cell carcinoma.
• Follicular basal cell carcinoma.
• Giant cell basal cell carcinoma.
• Granular cell basal cell carcinoma.
• Pleomorphic basal cell carcinoma.
• Signet ring basal cell carcinoma.
• Basal cell carcinomas with adnexal differentiation (eccrine, apocrine and sebaceous).
• Basal cell carcinoma with matricial differentiation.
• Basal cell carcinoma with myoepithelial differentiation.
• Basal cell carcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

basal cell carcinoma

Basal cell cancer, Ronald Reagan tumor Dermatology A usually indolent skin cancer most common in the sun-exposed regions of the head, neck, and upper body in older individuals Treatment Local excision; if areas where tissue border may compromise function or appearance–eg, angle of eyes, eyelids, nose, Mohs surgery may be indicated
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ba·sal cell car·ci·no·ma

, basal cell epithelioma (bā'săl sel kahr'si-nō'mă,ep'i-thē-lē-ō'mă)
A slow-growing, malignant, but usually nonmetastasizing epithelial neoplasm of the epidermis or hair follicles, most commonly arising in sun-damaged skin of the elderly and fair-skinned. Cryotherapy is the primary treatment to eradicate the lesion.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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BASAL CELL CARCINOMA
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BASAL CELL CARCINOMA

basal cell carcinoma

Abbreviation: BCC
The most common human cancer, typically found on skin exposed to sun or other forms of ultraviolet light. Although it is sometimes locally invasive, it rarely metastasizes to other organs. Typically it begins as a small, shiny papule. The lesion enlarges to form a whitish border around a central depression or ulcer that may bleed. When the lesion reaches this stage, it is often called a rodent ulcer. After biopsy, the removal method used is determined by the size, location, and appearance of the lesion. Synonym: basal cell epithelioma; epithelial cancer See: illustration
illustration
See also: carcinoma
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

basal cell carcinoma

Rodent ulcer. A common and increasingly common skin cancer representing about 80 per cent of all skin cancers. BCC can be very destructive locally if neglected, but rarely spreads to other parts of the body. It is related to excessive exposure to ultraviolet light from sunlight and sun beds.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ba·sal cell car·ci·no·ma

, basal cell epithelioma (bā'săl sel kahr'si-nō'mă, ep'i-thē-lē-ō'mă)
A slow-growing, invasive, but usually nonmetastasizing neoplasm recapitulating normal basal cells of the epidermis or hair follicles; most commonly found in sun-damaged skin of old people and fair-skinned people of any age group.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
MILAN -- A checkpoint inhibitor given with or without targeted therapy resulted in robust response rates in patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma, according to an investigator in a recent proof-of-concept study
- US-based biotechnology companies Phyton Biotech and PellePharm have forged an exclusive partnership to develop a plant cell culture-based process to enable the future renewable production of the raw material for PellePharm's patidegib, an investigational topical therapy for Gorlin Syndrome and High Frequency Basal Cell Carcinoma, the companies said.
Objective: To determine the success rate of surgical excision assisted with intra operative frozen section technique; in patients with high clinical suspicion of basal cell carcinoma at aesthetically important areas.
In the present study, an attempt has been made to describe in detail the management of patients with Basal Cell Carcinomas involving face.
Epstein, "Basal cell carcinomas: attack of the hedgehog," Nature Reviews Cancer, vol.
Since the boy's father had shown similar symptoms (odontogenic cysts, basal cell carcinomas) that could be in line with a Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, he, too, was tested for the PTCH1 variant and resulted to be carrier of the variant.
Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is the most common human cancer in Caucasians.
Dolan, "Follow-up of basal cell carcinomas: an audit of current practice," Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, vol.
Basal cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinoma-like changes overlying dermatofibromas.
Risk factors for histological types and anatomic sites of cutaneous basal cell carcinomas: an Italian case-control study.
Skin cancer can be split into two groups: malignant melanoma, which can prove fatal, and non-melanoma skin cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinomas which are rarely fatal.

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