barrier precautions

barrier precautions

A general term referring to any method or device used to reduce contact with potentially infectious body fluids, including facial masks, double gloving and fluid-resistant gowns.

barrier precautions

Infection control A general term referring to any method or device used to ↓ contact with potentially infectious body fluids, including facial masks, doubled gloves and fluid-resistant gowns. See Isolation, Reverse isolation, Universal precautions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lack of appropriate use of isolation or barrier precautions in the 2 instances of secondary transmission speaks to the importance of adhering to standard precautions when caring for all patients, regardless of their diagnosis or presumed infectious status.
Therefore, irrespective of medical history, suspicion of potential carriers should be regarded in all patients, thus, proper infection control protocol such as barrier precautions (i.e.
Other preventive measures include: Choosing appropriate sites for catheter insertion, appropriate type of catheter material, barrier precautions during insertion, changing catheter administration sets at appropriate intervals, ensuring proper catheter site care and ensuring removal of catheters when no longer essential.
40.0% [58/145], P = 0.010).[4] Therefore, physicians should emphasize the importance of barrier precautions, as well as appropriate antibiotic treatment.
[10] In fact, health-care providers should adhere to existing recommendations including use of maximal barrier precautions during catheter insertion and use of skilled personal to insert and maintain these catheters.
Barrier precautions to prevent healthcare-associated infections
State licensing board in Alabama, Arizona, California, Delaware, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, West Virginia, and Wisconsin requires continuing education in infection control and barrier precautions training for dental and other healthcare professionals to protect patients and healthcare workers.
Clinical practice changes made during the project include activities such as daily review of line necessity, maximum barrier precautions for insertion, and/or dedicated lumen for PN administration.
Bloomington, Ind.-based Cook Medical's Spectrum catheters include the antibiotics minocycline and rifampin and meet the newly released 1A recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for reducing catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) if maximal sterile barrier precautions haven't helped a facility reach its [infection prevention] goal.
Despite a category 1A recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) for reducing CRBSI if maximal sterile barrier precautions haven't helped a facility reach its goal, these catheters comprise just a small percentage of the millions of CVCs sold each year in the U.S.