barren

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bar·ren

(bar'en),
Unable to produce a pregnancy.
[M.E. bareyne]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

barren

(băr′ən)
adj.
a. Not producing or incapable of producing offspring. Used of female animals.
b. Often Offensive Not producing or incapable of producing offspring. Used of women.

bar′ren·ly adv.
bar′ren·ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Infertile, sterile, fruitless
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

barren

adjective Gynecology Infertile, sterile, fruitless, inconceivable
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

barren

Sterile. Incapable of producing offspring.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In her book "Waiting for Wonder--Learning to Live on God's Timeline," Marlo Schalesky takes the reader on Saria's journey from the shame, guilt and pain of barrenness, through years of dryness, the promise of a new start, a new dream, and a new life.
In texts such as John Ball's The Female Physician and Nicholas Venette's Conjugal Love Reveal'd, for example, there is a clear tendency to ascribe the category of impotence to men and barrenness to women.
DESCRIPTION: "Beginnings and Beginning Again: The Stories of Genesis." Biblical scholar Kathleen O'Connor will explore ancient Israel's struggles mirrored in their first ancestors' barrenness, squabbles and battles.
For example, in the north, Lon Gwyrfai is a four-mile walk from the barrenness and tranquility of Rhyd Ddu to village bustle in Beddgelert.
At Madrid, for instance, the opera opens with a completely bare stage, in accordance with the libretto's references to a desert landscape; Mahagonny is then built up upon this barrenness, and the stage is gradually filled in with buildings.
These etymologies are worth considering in the context of Jackie Clark's Aphoria, a gnomic book that could be "about" any of those ideas: language breaking down, a speech-act of doubt, or a sort of barrenness.
It is also a very common cause of barrenness, abortion and weak lambs born alive.
Dark, flat, and in surrealistically saturated color, they are almost exclusively rural and small-town Siberian interiors, in which barrenness coexists with high-contrast visual riot, and in which the inhabitants are simultaneously fragmentary and perfectly at home.
Amit Mehra's images of the 'troubled paradise' capture the beauty and barrenness of Kashmir as its people fight back the memories of violence
Summary: Mythology reveals a widespread, though not universal, identification of the earthly processes of growth and fruition, necessary for human nourishment and survival, with female bodily properties of fertility and barrenness, and the processes of gestation and childbirth.
this is what mainly happened and be one reasons of spreading the sever chronic diseases, allergies, barrenness in both genders, confirmed Dr.