bandwagon effect


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bandwagon effect

A type of herd mentality in which a belief or trend cascades and becomes increasingly popular as more people “climb on board” and subscribe to belief or trend, regardless of personal convictions and scant evidence the bandwagon’s validity; people often climb on bandwagon to be on the winning or popular side.

bandwagon effect

(band′wag″ŏn)
A method of making decisions based on people's perceptions of what others have decided whether or not they have made a thoughtful choice. It is decision making based on peer pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2009) are based on uniqueness and bandwagon effects, which may be considered antecedents of the scarce equals good heuristic.
This could be indirect proof of the fact that part of the group of PD switchers was affected by some sort of postelection bandwagon effect. However, the coefficient of the circle of friends remains insignificant.
A review of the three elections with obvious bandwagon effects reveals no consistent pattern.
This ongoing phenomenon, known as the "bandwagon effect," will continue to grow until it reaches an equilibrium point, where no additional citizens have incentives to be part of the rebellion.
The horse race becomes more important than the candidates' message, a problem because of a recurring bandwagon effect. The authors show a bias in the major networks' coverage, centering more negative attention on Republican candidates than on Democratic candidates, but concentrating their coverage on the negative aspects of the campaign.
This time, there was another development: Merah's murders created a bandwagon effect of attacks on French Jews unrelated to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.
Improved poll numbers and a brightening economy, as well as the bandwagon effect of a smattering of stars coming out in support.
Appraisers and investment analysts in New York City relied too heavily in other buyers' confidence, and this created a "bandwagon effect" in which everybody was jumping in the market and overpaying for the properties, not necessarily because they believed in theft intrinsic value, but because they relied on other investors' judgment.
This is because of the "bandwagon effect": any firm that makes a profit quickly attracts rivals into its market.
On top of that, there is a bandwagon effect that comes about with a site that is so popular.
Indeed, over the past 30 years, we have witnessed the bandwagon effect of popular management movements such as management by objectives; reinventing government; reengineering; the balanced scorecard; and the latest craze, Lean and Six Sigma.
The current evolution is part of the "bandwagon effect," where people tend to follow the crowd without examining the merits of their particular actions.