bandwagon effect


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

bandwagon effect

A type of herd mentality in which a belief or trend cascades and becomes increasingly popular as more people “climb on board” and subscribe to belief or trend, regardless of personal convictions and scant evidence the bandwagon’s validity; people often climb on bandwagon to be on the winning or popular side.

bandwagon effect

(band′wag″ŏn)
A method of making decisions based on people's perceptions of what others have decided whether or not they have made a thoughtful choice. It is decision making based on peer pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
As [sigma] continued to decrease, fewer individual thresholds were met, and some protesters abandoned the movement, dissuading other individuals as well as creating a reverse bandwagon effect.
Biddle (1991) used an 11-state 100-point panel data set to test for the existence of a bandwagon effect.
This claim could probably be chalked up to the bandwagon effect.
American research experience on the bandwagon effect has been mixed.
With some luck, skillful pollsters can create a bandwagon effect for their candidate.
Even in a protest campaign, gathering votes inevitably takes priority because reaching some threshold of electoral support is necessary to establish credibility and create a bandwagon effect.
We're not convinced that there are currently more than 3-4 million hard-core Windows users, but these users tend to be extraordinarily active software buyers; they've contributed to a bandwagon effect that will eventually carry Windows onto most of the right desktops.
The bandwagon effect is a consumption externality that exists when an individual's demand for a good is increased by his observation of other consumers using that good.
The bandwagon effect is similar to keeping up with the Jones's.
There is also a bandwagon effect -- if a small number of funds decide to oppose management it becomes easier for a few other funds to do the same, which in turn makes it even easier for some other funds, and so on.
This is a different discipline, though, so has to prove it (beaten at evens only time at the trip) and there could well be a bandwagon effect with his price, as a strict reading of his form doesn't make him that much better than many of these.
It also identifies a bandwagon effect, in which jurisdictions are more likely to adopt IZ programs when their neighbors have already adopted one.