balsam of Peru


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Related to balsam of Peru: balsam of tolu, Peruvian balsam

bal·sam of Pe·ru

a thick, dark brown liquid balsam obtained from Toluifera pereirae (family Leguminosae), 60% of which is the oily cinnamein; used as a healing application to wounds.

balsam of Peru

n.
The thick brown aromatic resin of a Central American tree (Myroxylon balsamum var. pereirae) in the pea family, used medicinally in skin lotions, allergy testing, and cough preparations and in the manufacture of perfumes.

balsam of Peru

Herbal medicine
An evergreen tree, the resin of which is anthelmintic, antifungal, astringent and diuretic; it has been used internally and externally for haemorrhoids and skin infections.

bal·sam of Pe·ru

(bawl'săm pĕr-ū')
A liquid extracted from the bark of Myroxylon balsamum; has mildly astringent properties; other purported uses include as an antineoplastic, anthelminthic, stimulant, and as an adjunct during dental procedures. Adverse effects have been widely reported.
Synonym(s): Toluifera pereirae.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of patch testing were read at 48 and 96 hours; testing elicited positive reactions to balsam of Peru and to one of its components, cinnamic aldehyde (figure 2).
At follow-up, she was further counseled on the need to avoid fragrances because of their potential cross-reactivity with balsam of Peru. (2)
Balsam of Peru is a gum resin extracted from the Myroxylon balsamum tree, which is native to South and Central America.
Allergens that may peak early include thiuram mix, carba mix, and balsam of Peru. Those that disappear after 5 days include balsam of Peru, benzoic acid, disperse blue #124, fragrance mix, mercury, methyldibromo glutaronitrile, phenoxyethanol, and octyl gallate.
For example, a pattern of perioral dermatitis may suggest an allergy to fragrances or balsam of Peru, whereas earlobe dermatitis in a young girl with pierced ears suggests a metal allergy.
Two common fragrance allergens, cinnamic alcohol and cinnamic aldehyde, are components of balsam of Peru. These substances can be ingredients in soaps and shampoos, as well as in many foods, including tomato-based products such as ketchup, and artificially flavored soft drinks.
Women who react to lactic acid are usually hypersensitive to other substances, he added, listing cause-and-effect relationships between capsaicin and pain, histamine and itching, harsh soaps or cleansers and tightness, and balsam of Peru and burning.
Most Common Allergic Responses to Patch Test in 2003 Nickel sulfate 16.2% Balsam of Peru 12.3% Neomycin 11.5% Fragrance mix 10.9% Thimerosal 10.8% Sodium gold thiosulfate 10.5% Formaldehyde 9.2% Quaternium-15 9.2% Bacitracin 9.2% Cobalt chloride 7.6% Note: Among 5,812 patients with suspected contact dermatitis.