balloon

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bal·loon

(bă-lūn'),
1. An inflatable spheric or ovoid device used to retain tubes or catheters in, or provide support to, various body structures.
2. A distensible device used to stretch or occlude a viscus or blood vessel.
3. To distend a body cavity with a gas or fluid to facilitate its examination, dilate a structure, occlude a lumen, or create a space for a retroperitoneal, laparoscopic procedure.
[Fr. ballon, fr. It. ballone, fr. balla, ball, fr. Germanic]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

balloon

(bə-lo͞on′)
n.
Medicine An inflatable device that is inserted into a body cavity or structure and distended with air or gas for therapeutic purposes, such as angioplasty.

bal·loon′ist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

balloon

Cardiology
See Cutting balloon, Inoue balloon.

Vox populi
A thin-walled expandable sac which may be filled with gas or fluids.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bal·loon

(bă-lūn')
1. An inflatable spheric or ovoid device used to retain tubes or catheters in, or provide support to, various body structures.
2. A distensible device used to stretch or occlude a stenotic viscus or blood vessel.
3. To distend a body cavity with a gas or fluid to facilitate its examination, dilate a structure, or occlude its lumen.
[Fr. ballon, fr. It. ballone, fr. balla, ball, fr. Germanic]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bal·loon

(bă-lūn')
1. An inflatable spheric or ovoid device used to retain tubes or catheters in, or provide support to, various body structures.
2. A distensible device used to stretch or occlude a viscus or blood vessel.
3. To distend a body cavity with a gas or fluid to facilitate its examination, dilate a structure, occlude a lumen, or create a space for a retroperitoneal, laparoscopic procedure.
[Fr. ballon, fr. It. ballone, fr. balla, ball, fr. Germanic]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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